Entries

All entries for the FACE 2011 Exhibit are listed in order by the author's last name.
Use Ctrl + F to search for a specific name or entry.

 

Dr. Mary Frances Agnello
Associate Professor
Education

Alternative Teacher Certification Program and Diversity in the Schools
Dual tensions in the classroom provide the impetus for this research—one for highly qualified teachers who promote all students’ success, including those from diverse backgrounds; the other—for teachers who are in short supply, particularly in science, math, special education and bilingual education. The alternative certification programs (ACP) route of credentialing educators is now mainstream and, therefore not “alternative”; however, it is difficult to discern the effectiveness of the AC Programs or the individuals who have completed them.

Professor Future Akins-Tillett
Associate Professor
Art

Pieces of the Whole
Like a crazy quilt, pieces from a life well lived are joined to form new images and new insights. A visual diary of personal symbols, romantically remembered.

Ms. Minerva Alaniz
Assistant Librarian
Libraries

Alternative Teacher Certification Program and Diversity in the Schools
Dual tensions in the classroom provide the impetus for this research—one for highly qualified teachers who promote all students’ success, including those from diverse backgrounds; the other—for teachers who are in short supply, particularly in science, math, special education and bilingual education. The alternative certification programs (ACP) route of credentialing educators is now mainstream and, therefore not “alternative”; however, it is difficult to discern the effectiveness of the AC Programs or the individuals who have completed them.

Government Documents en Español
This program identifies Texas and federal information resources in Spanish for personal use and research. The speakers highlight selling points for providing government information to the diverse Hispanic community and offering outreach services.

Service Learning and Academic Librarians: Partners and Collaborators
This workshop will help participants understand the role that academic librarians play in partnering and collaborating with faculty in developing service learning courses. The workshops will use the Texas Tech University Library as a model for such a partnership and include a hands-on exercise in identifying librarian roles in developing a service learning course.

What Has the Government Done for Me Lately? Finding and Using Government Information Online
Finding local, state, regional, federal/national and international government information online.

Dr. Cherif Amor
Chair & Associate Professor
Design

Evidence-based Design: What Kind of Conceptual Framework?
This panel presentation proposes to explore the meanings associated with the concept of EBD, but also looks at the possibility of establishing a conceptual framework through further collaborative research endeavor, bringing in symbiosis researchers from industry and academia.

Dr. Brian Ancell
Assistant Professor
Geosciences

Evaluation of Surface Analyses and Forecasts with a Multi-scale Ensemble Kalman Filter in Regions of Complex Terrain
This article evaluates surface analyses and six-hour forecasts from an ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) data assimilation/modeling system in regions of complex terrain. Such complex terrain presents a challenge for any data assimilation system - we test the EnKF here as it is able to spread observational information in a flowdependent way that may be critical in mountainous areas. It is found that EnKF surface analyses and forecasts are superior at high resolution, and they outperform analyses from current U.S. analysis techniques that use other data assimilation techniques.

Dr. Todd A. Anderson
Professor
Environmental Toxicology

Effects of Predator Cues on Pesticide Toxicity: Toward an Understanding of the Mechanisms of the Interaction
Predation stress is an important component for structuring communities and ecosystem processes and typically co-occurs with environmental contaminants. We examined the effects of fish predator (bluegill, Lepomis macrochirus) cues on toxicity of five different pesticides to the freshwater zooplankton, Ceriodaphnia dubia. Our results demonstrate that factors such as pesticide bioavailability, Koc and exposure concentration may be important for predicting the occurrence of synergistic and antagonistic interactions and that patterns were not consistent among pesticides varying in mechanism of toxic action. Furthermore, our results suggest that fully understanding how ecological stressors may interact with organic contaminants may best be achieved by examination at toxicokinetic and toxicodynamic scales.

Mr. Fatih Ari
Instructor
Educational Psychology & Leadership

Formative Evaluation of an Adaptive Web-based Learning System
The purpose of this study was to document the processes involved in two phases of formative evaluation of an adaptive web-based system which individualized instruction such as content, interfaces and instructional strategies dependent on two factors: student motivation and prior knowledge.

Mrs. Ismahan Arslan-Ari
Instructor
Educational Psychology & Leadership

Formative Evaluation of an Adaptive Web-based Learning System
The purpose of this study was to document the processes involved in two phases of formative evaluation of an adaptive web-based system which individualized instruction such as content, interfaces and instructional strategies dependent on two factors: student motivation and prior knowledge.

Mr. Innocent Awasom
Assistant Librarian
Libraries

Commodity of the Quarter: Tea
This article is about the history, global evolution, culture and health benefits of tea. It also provides business-related information, including trade associations, publications, global market share and industry trends in tea production and trade.

Service Learning and Academic Librarians: Partners and Collaborators
This workshop will help participants understand the role that academic librarians play in partnering and collaborating with faculty in developing service learning courses. The workshops will use the Texas Tech University Library as a model for such a partnership and include a hands-on exercise in identifying librarian roles in developing a service learning course.

Social Media and Social Events for Effective Outreach to Our Client Base
Information and Communications Technologies have significantly changed the way we do business in libraries. From the era of library as a place, we have since moved to an anytime, anywhere access to credible resources. Librarians bridge the gap between students who are more technologically adept than their instructors and/or faculty members presenting thus an interesting balancing act. This poster focuses on new and innovative ways of utilizing social media and social events to facilitate information literacy components into websites and pedagogies, technologies students are familiar with but don't think critically about. Facebook, MySpace, podcasts, audio mashups, wikis, book trailers, QR Codes etc. are examined in context. Social events such as FACE, faculty meetings, coffee hours, research conferences, workshops, club meetings, etc. present great opportunities for socializing, networking and teachable moments to get our information literacy message across in a convivial atmosphere.

Mr. Ian Barba
Assistant Librarian
Libraries

PHITE Club
Librarians often are called upon to give presentations to patrons, administration or a collection of their peers. While many are excellent presenters, some librarians struggle with speaking in public or do not have many opportunities to do so outside of a formal conference. Believing the best cure is practice, we developed the Present Hypothesis In Team Environment (PHITE) Club. (Pronounced like "fight.") Establishing some house rules, we strive to create a supportive (but not coddling) environment where the club meets once a month for a presentation by one its members. These presentations allow library staff to share topics they have been researching or implementing in their part of the organization and receive feedback on their topic and presentation skills.

Search Engine Optimization and Information Literacy: Divergent Priorities for Academic Libraries
The entry is primarily a library research paper about search engine optimization and information literacy. It examines the ramifications of both phenomena, and their impact on library services. Also included are PowerPoint presentation slides.

Ms. Shelley Barba
Assistant Librarian
Libraries

In the Peanut Gallery with Mystery Science Theater 3000: Essays on Film, Fandom, Technology and the Culture of Riffing
These essays represent the first full-length scholarly analysis of the award-winning television series Mystery Science Theater 3000. The series featured a human host and a pair of robotic puppets who, while being subjected to some of the worst films ever made, provided ongoing hilarious and insightful commentary in a style popularly known as “riffing.” The show has been described as “the smartest, funniest show in America,” and forever changed the way we watch movies.

PHITE Club
Librarians often are called upon to give presentations to patrons, administration or a collection of their peers. While many are excellent presenters, some librarians struggle with speaking in public or do not have many opportunities to do so outside of a formal conference. Believing the best cure is practice, we developed the Present Hypothesis In Team Environment (PHITE) Club. (Pronounced like "fight.") Establishing some house rules, we strive to create a supportive (but not coddling) environment where the club meets once a month for a presentation by one its members. These presentations allow library staff to share topics they have been researching or implementing in their part of the organization and receive feedback on their topic and presentation skills.

Dr. Alan Barenberg
Assistant Professor
History

Tiede ja asuttaminen varhaisessa Gulagissa (Discovering Vorkuta: Science and Colonization in the Early Gulag)
This article examines the role of scientists and the idea of colonization in the foundation of the Soviet system of forced labor (Gulag).

Dr. Richard A. Bartsch
Horn Professor
Chemistry

Effect of Cation Symmetry on the Morphology and Physicochemical Properties of Imidazolium Ionic Liquids
This article reports a study of the effect of cation symmetry on the morphology and physicochemical properties of 1,3-dialkylimidazolium ionic liquids. Small-wide-angle X-ray scattering measurements indicate that the structural heterogeneities are larger in the asymmetric ionic liquid with a methyl group and an (N-1) carbonatom alkyl chain on the imidazolium ring of the cation than in a symmetric ionic liquid with two N/2 carbonatom alkyl chains on the imidazolium ring of the cation. For a symmetric/asymmetric ionic liquid pair with a given N, the viscosity of the asymmetric ionic liquid is greater than that of the symmetry ionic liquid. We discuss in this article how the structural heterogeneities and the physicochemical properties of these ionic liquids are consistent with alkyl tail segregation.

Effect of Cation Symmetry on the Low-Frequency Spectra of Imidazolium Ionic Liquids: OKE and Raman Spectroscopic Measurements and DFT Calculations
This article reports a study of the low-frequency optical Kerr effect and Raman spectra of two imidazolium ionic liquids that differ only in the symmetry of the alkyl substitution on the imidazolium ring of the cation. Density function theory calculations on the isolated ions provide guidance in the assignment of the OKE and Raman spectra in the 0-200 wavenumber region to intermolecular and intramolecular vibrational modes of the liquid.

Dr. Laura Beard
Professor and Interim Chair
Classical & Modern Languages & Literatures

Intertexts Special Issue on Gender, Culture and Literature in Indigenous North America
Special issue focusing on gender issues, culture and literature in Native North America, co-edited with Kathryn Shanley.

Teaching Native Autobiographies as Acts of Narrative Resistance: Ethical Issues and Approaches
This article focuses on pedagogical issues related to teaching autobiographical works by Native authors, with suggestions for those who are not Native scholars or trained in Native Studies, so that they might have more successful experiences introducing Native texts into their classrooms.

Traduzindo Culturas: Questões Éticas ao Lecionar Narrativas de Vida de Outras Culturas
This chapter looks at ethical issues involved in teaching Native literature from outside that culture.

Mr. John T. "Jack" Becker
Associate Librarian
Libraries

James Bond in World and Popular Culture
Provides the most comprehensive study of the James Bond phenomena ever published. Forty original essays provide new insights, scholarship and understanding to the world of James Bond. Topics include the Bond girl, Bond related video games, Ian Fleming's relationship with the notorious Aleister Crowley and CIA director Alan Dulles, and much more. Scholars from a wide variety of disciplines have contributed a unique collection of perspectives on the world of James Bond and its history.

Dr. Norman Bert
Professor
Theatre & Dance

Mark and Aristotle: The Christ Embodied as Tragic Hero
Norman Bert's essay "Mark and Aristotle" was one of 25 essays selected for publication in Taking Captive Every Thought: Forty Years of the Christian Scholar's Review, a festschrift published in celebration of CSR's 40th anniversary. The 25 articles selected were judged to be the best published in the journal's 40-year history. Bert's essay argues that the writer of Mark's Gospel, the first of the four canonical Gospels, utilized principles formulated in Aristotle's "Poetics" to compose his work.

Professor Gerry Beyer
Governor Preston E. Smith Regents Professor
Law

Beyer's Texas Property Code Annotated, 2010 Edition
Provides a compact and authoritative presentation of the Texas Property Code and related Texas laws, including the full text of the Texas Title Examination Standards. Combines the most salient features of an unannotated code, compactness and portability, and those of a fully annotated code, interpretative aids, into a single publication containing a carefully constructed selection of primary law materials relating to Texas property law practice. Contains the full text of the Property Code, and related statutes, accompanied by interpretative aids which are highly focused, concise, practical and authoritative.

Critters in the Estate Plan
This article describes the importance of a pet owner making arrangements for his or her non-human family members when preparing an estate plan.

Fat Cats and Lucky Dogs: How to Leave (Some of) Your Estate to Your Pet
By taking a few easy steps, you can improve your pet's chance of survival should you be unable to look after it because of temporary or permanent illness or even death. But if you want more than survival for your pet, you will need a comprehensive plan that legally allows you to provide a caregiver and the funds needed to look after Fido or Felix. This book takes readers through a step-by-step process for making sure you can provide long-term care for your pet.

Wills & Trusts
This article discusses judicial and legislative developments relating to the Texas law of intestacy, wills, estate administration, trusts and other estate planning matters. The discussion of most cases includes a moral, that is, the important lesson to be learned from the case. By recognizing situations which have lead to time consuming and costly litigation in the past, the reader may be able to reduce the likelihood of the same situations arising with his or her clients.

Dr. Paul Bjerk
Assistant Professor
History

Sovereignty and Socialism in Tanzania: The Historiography of an African State
This article analyzes 206 books and articles on the Tanzanian state, and argues that this work evinces a division between an interest in the question of sovereignty in a post-colonial state and separate concern with Tanzania's implications for the socialist theory that was in vogue in the 1960s and 1970s. The article serves as an extended literature review that will be useful for students and scholars trying to understand modern Tanzania in the broader context of scholarship on post-colonial Africa.

Dr. Allison Boye
TEACH Program Director
Teaching, Learning & Technology Center

Growing a New Generation: Promoting Self-reflection through Peer Observation
Many faculty developers understand the value of self-reflection in effective teaching and aim to cultivate the practice in their programming. However, many instructors regard peer observation as punitive or evaluative in nature. This chapter outlines a model of group peer observation implemented in a graduate student development program that transforms that negative perception, instead supporting introspection and community. We discuss how the process promotes a culture of open-door teaching across disciplines and emphasizes the importance of reflective practice in individual change and teaching improvement, and how faculty developers from institutions and programs of all sizes can help nurture that growth.

Dr. Cristina Brădăţan
Assistant Professor
Sociology, Anthropology and Social Work

Immigrants, Risk and Economic Crisis in Spain
The thrust of this paper is to study how the recent economic crisis affects the labor careers of various immigrant groups in comparison to the natives in Spain. My analysis is based on three concepts borrowed by Breen (1997) from the financial market theory: the hedging of risk, the transfer of risk and recommodification, applied to the particular situation of immigrants in a situation of economic crisis.

Dr. Hansel Burley
Associate Dean for Graduate Education; Research Professor
Educational Psychology & Leadership

Teaching Diversity across Disciplines: Reflections from African-American Faculty in Four Different Academic Settings
The authors, male and female African-American faculty from different academic disciplines at predominantly white institutions (PWIs), share personal reflections on the laborious experiences teaching postsecondary graduate and professional courses that focus on diversity and multicultural themes. The article will provide tools and strategies for improving the overall effectiveness for those who teach diversity courses from a framework the authors have codified as a 3-C perspective: context, characters and curriculum.

Dr. Laura Calkins
Assistant Professor
History

Patrolling the Ether: US-UK Open Source Intelligence Cooperation and the BBC's Emergence as an Intelligence Agency, 1939-1948
The BBC began recording, translating and publishing selected open radio broadcasts by foreign stations at the beginning of World War II. This open source intelligence, or 'osint,' was provided to the United States starting in 1941, and America's own monitoring agencies reciprocated, albeit with certain key restrictions. By mid-1943 the BBC monitored 1.25 million broadcast words daily. At the war's end, questions arose in Whitehall about maintaining the BBC osint operation, but an interagency coalition prevailed over the cost-conscious Treasury. US-UK osint exchanges broadened after the war as part of a larger set of bilateral intelligence-sharing agreements.

Ms. Donell Callender
Associate Librarian
Libraries

IMPS: Innovations, Mobility and Personalized Service
Innovations, mobility and personalized services (IMPS) have significantly changed the way we do business in libraries. From the era of "library as place" and librarian "behind the desk," students and faculty have moved to accessing library resources anytime, anywhere. Librarians are incorporating IMPS into websites and pedagogy, but they are presented with a balancing act between technologically adept students and their oftentimes less technologically proficient professors.

Mr. Bruce Cammack
Associate Librarian for Rare Books
Libraries

Native American Women Through the Lens of Edward S. Curtis
A selection of 12 photographs depicting Native American girls and women from Curtis's work, “The North American Indian.”

The Romantic Indian
The exhibit explored Romanticism's attitudes toward Native Americans, drawing from British authors such as Byron and Wordsworth and Americans such as Cooper and Whittier. It was created for the 2010 International Conference on Romanticism, held at Texas Tech in November of 2010.

Professor Bryan Camp
George H. Mahon Professor
Law

Interpreting Statutory Silence
Exploring the application of Chevron to interpreting the Tax Code and the role of courts in reviewing Treasury regulations in the context of a specific controversy about I.R.C. §6015, the innocent spouse provisions.

Theory and Practice in Tax Administration
Detailing the history of the use of automation in tax administration and the effect on taxpayer compliance.

What Good is the National Taxpayer Advocate?
Reviewing and critiquing the role of the National Taxpayer Service in tax administration.

Dr. Paul Carlson
Professor Emeritus
History

Myth, Memory and Massacre: The Pease River Capture of Cynthia Ann Parker
A re-examination of historical accounts of the 1860 "Battle of Pease River," when the white woman Cynthia Ann Parker was retaken from her Indian captors, exposes errors, falsifications and mysteries that contributed to a skewed understanding of the facts. For political and racist reasons, a massacre of women and children was instead labeled a battle. Firsthand testimony was fabricated; diaries were changed; the official Ranger report went missing from the state adjutant general's office. This publication questions the assumptions surrounding an infamous episode in Texas history and what constitutes reliable knowledge.

Dr. Stacy Carter
Assistant Professor
Educational Psychology & Leadership

A Comparison of Various Forms of Reinforcement with and without Extinction as Treatment for Escape-maintained Problem Behavior
Compared the effects of reinforcing compliance with either positive or negative reinforcement for a participant who displayed escape-maintained problem behavior. Results indicated that positive reinforcement in the form of a highly preferred edible or leisure item produced higher levels of compliance and lower levels of problem behavior when compared to negative reinforcement in the form of escape from demands. An extinction procedure was unnecessary to achieve high levels of compliance.

Dr. Jamie Chapman
Adjunct Professor
Wind Science & Engineering Research Center

Gear with Asymmetric Teeth for Use in Wind Turbines
There is a concern on the reliability of wind turbines, directed to the fact that gearbox failure has been a major problem in the wind industry. The objective of this research was to design and construct a test bed for testing the performance of asymmetric gears. The tests to be performed on the test bed include gear dynamics, tip relief modification, high-contact-ratio and wear.

Dr. Ming Chyu
Professor
Mechanical Engineering

Application of Probability Theory in Predicting Human Life Expectancy
This paper probabilistically investigates trends of human aging of different age groups of the population based on their annual mortality rate. Two leading causes of death are selected and analyzed for two consecutive years of 2005 and 2006. Probabilistic results were compared with the targeted probability to determine the significance of the mortality decease in each age group. Results of a probabilistic sensitivity analysis are presented.

Professor Don Collier
Associate Professor
Design

The Design of a Research Center for Human Development and Family Studies
The department of Human Development and Family Studies was in need of a research center for the observation of children and family interaction along with focus group research gathering. This space is to support both ongoing and future research within the department. Research was being conducted in whatever spaces were available all over the College of Human Sciences building and was not conducive to collaboration between researchers.

A Design Studio for Creative Research in Interior Design
To find space on a crowded university campus to work on research is hard. To find a space to work as a studio for creative research in design is almost impossible. The problem is that the process of design takes space; space for layout, space for meetings/collaboration, space to meet with clients and vendors, space for pin up and analyzation, space for a graduate student, and finally space to write and publish.

Dr. Stephen Cox
Associate Professor
TIEHH - Environmental Toxicology

Pacific Ocean-wide Profile of CYP1A1 Expression, Stable Carbon and Nitrogen Isotope Ratios and Organic Contaminant Burden in Sperm Whale Skin Biopsies
First Pacific Ocean-wide profile of environmental pollution in threatened sperm whales. Analyses of skin biopsies revealed whales from the Galápagos Islands, a UNESCO World Heritage marine reserve, may have been exposed to higher levels of pollution than whales from other Pacific Ocean locations, including areas closer to continents and industrial or agricultural activities.

Dr. Sean Cunningham
Associate Professor
History

Cowboy Conservatism: Texas and the Rise of the Modern Right
Texas and Texans played a unique role in the shift in American politics to the right. Discusses how Texans' ideas of conservatism influenced the nation.

Dr. Howard Curzer
Professor
Philosophy

Spies and Lies: Faithful, Courageous Israelites and Truthful Spies
The leader of a great nation ponders the invasion of a country in the Middle East. The majority report of his intelligence agency indicates that an invasion would be a bad idea, but the leader invades anyway, citing a minority report. As predicted, the invasion runs into trouble. Later, the leader gives a distorted history of the events leading up to the war, portraying himself as blameless, and accusing the naysayers of lacking courage and faith. Of course, the leader is Moses; the incident is the Israelites' abortive first invasion of the Promised Land; and the intelligence agency consists of 12 spies. This article presents a novel interpretation of Numbers 13-14, a hermeneutical maxim for dealing with inconsistencies between Deuteronomy and the rest of the Torah, and a political moral.

Mr. Justin Daniel
Assistant Librarian
Libraries

Meeting the Changing Needs of Today’s University Students with a Technology-enhanced Collaborative Learning Area
This poster, presented at the Texas Library Association Annual Conference, highlights the new GroupWorks group study area recently launched at Texas Tech University Libraries. The area facilitates collaboration between students within the library and between blended groups that might also include students and/or faculty from across campus, off-campus, or even in another part of the world. Resources include conference-style media tables with built-in, large-screen monitors and individual laptop connections, videoconferencing equipment, giant rolling touch-screen monitors that offer interactive white board capabilities, and more.

Dr. Mayukh Dass
Assistant Professor
Marketing

An Investigation of Willingness to Spend Dynamics in Simultaneous Online Auctions
In this paper, we investigate the dynamics of WTS of a simultaneous online auction of a specific genre of fine art called modern Indian art and compare it with the dynamics of cumulative Willingness to Pay (WTP), using an innovative statistical method called Functional Data Analysis. Functional Data Analysis, which is fundamentally considered to recover the underlying WTS and cumulative WTP function curves of each bidder, is further used to examine the effects of current number of bids, current number of lots winning, pre-auction low estimate of the lots they are currently winning, bid time, and number of proxy bids on WTS and cumulative WTP dynamics. Result suggests that only current number of bids and bid time have significant positive effect on the bidder WTS, whereas only current number of bids have influence on cumulative WTP.

Mr. Rick Dingus
Professor
Art

Llano Estacado
An explanation of different ways of seeing and understanding the High-Staked Plain of Texas and New Mexico.

Ms. Kathrin Dodds
Electronic Resources Librarian
Libraries

James Bond Audiography
Academic librarians serve a diverse community and use a variety of reference sources to answer their community's questions. Many questions are answered by reference sources that are not found in traditional formats like books and are now commonly found in electronic sources. As such they sometimes "fall" through the cracks. For instance, little has been written or documented relating to James Bond talking books. We hope to rectify this problem with the following "audiography" of Bond-related audio books. Despite the fact that cassette technology is now obsolete and CD is not far behind, this "audiography" lists items published to date (2009) on cassette, CD, MP3, wma file and audio download. Bond fans and scholars will find this audiography a useful addition to the documentation of James Bond in its various formats.

Dr. Jerry Dwyer
Associate Professor
Mathematics & Statistics

Science and Mathematics Integrated Activities for Middle School
This book contains a series of lesson plans for middle level K-12 classrooms. Each chapter contains three lessons on a particular theme in mathematics and science. There is an introduction to each theme at the beginning of the chapter and additional mathematical background is provided in appendices.

Dr. Stephen Ekwaro-Osire
Professor
Mechanical Engineering

Application of Probability Theory in Predicting Human Life Expectancy
This paper probabilistically investigates trends of human aging of different age groups of the population based on their annual mortality rate. Two leading causes of death are selected and analyzed for two consecutive years of 2005 and 2006. Probabilistic results were compared with the targeted probability to determine the significance of the mortality decease in each age group. Results of a probabilistic sensitivity analysis are presented.

An Approach that Can Quickly Assess Product Reliability
This article discusses the combining of multiple testing approaches to ensure that the reliability requirement of a design is met or exceeded while at the same time having the capability to reduce the testing cycle time when required due to schedule and cost constraints. The methodology is to utilize a combination of multiple testing approaches to accomplish this task by exploring complementary testing ideas from various technologies that have been utilized previously with documented success.

Coupling Gait and Mental Workload
When the mental workloads and the gait control are coherent, the capability to prepare for a perturbation is enhanced. Thirty volunteers walked with harness on instrumented treadmill. The results show that there is no significant phase spectrum effect, but significant amplitude effect of cross-spectrum. For those subjects who could not recover from the perturbation within one step, the entropy of the cross-periodogram is significantly decayed due to the increase mental workload.

Efficiency of the High Contact Ratio Involute Spur Gears with Asymmetric Teeth
In this study, the results obtained on high contact ratio involute spur gears with asymmetric teeth are presented and discussed. The impact of a few design parameters, such as a pressure angle or tooth height, on sliding velocities and friction is investigated and illustrated with numerical examples.

Examining Gear Design for Increased Reliability
This article addresses why new gearbox designs are needed because of increasing performance requirements put on wind turbines.

Experimental and Probabilistic Analysis of Asymmetric Gear Tooth
The objective of this study was to perform an experimental study and probabilistic analysis of an asymmetric gear tooth. The uncertainty considered involves the material properties and geometry. In this study, different asymmetric gear tooth profiles were manufactured from PSM-5 photoelastic material. This study shows that the combination of photoelastic experiments and probabilistic analyses may be an effective tool to study the advantages of asymmetric gear over the symmetric gears.

Gear with Asymmetric Teeth for Use in Wind Turbines
There is a concern on the reliability of wind turbines, directed to the fact that gearbox failure has been a major problem in the wind industry. The objective of this research was to design and construct a test bed for testing the performance of asymmetric gears. The tests to be performed on the test bed include gear dynamics, tip relief modification, high-contact-ratio and wear.

High-level Fusion for Intelligence Applications using Recombinant Cognition Synthesis
Recombinant Cognition Synthesis bridges the implementation gap of existing fusion models by defining a comprehensive framework of semantic, temporal and geospatial enablers comprising the primitives, functions and models, which through a recombinant workflow, maximize the data exploitation value-chain. This paper presents a methodology and the underlying architectural components necessary to implement a unified highlevel fusion intelligence application, followed by a case study that demonstrates the resulting improvements in knowledge discovery and predictive accuracy.

Increasing Pre-activation of the Quadriceps Muscle Protects the Anterior Cruciate Ligament during the Landing Phase of a Jump: An In Vitro Simulation
We hypothesize that application of an unopposed quadriceps force coupled with an impulsive ground reaction force may induce anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. This situation is similar to landing from a jump if only the quadriceps muscle is active; an unlikely but presumably dangerous circumstance. The purpose of this study was to test our hypothesis using in vitro simulation of jump landing. A jump-landing simulator was utilized. Nine cadaveric knees were tested at an initial flexion angle of 20 degrees.

Influence of Storage Duration on Retention of Original Fracture Toughness
Often when bone properties are measured experimentally for the prediction of failure and the development of injury treatment protocols, bone specimens have to be chemically preserved prior to or during testing; degradation of properties due to preservation methods may lead to incorrect reporting of values of the bone properties. A salient question is, therefore, whether the preservation of bovine cortical bone in ethanol for extended periods of time affects fracture toughness; and if so, whether that is reversible.

Influence of Tip Relief Modification on the Wear of Spur Gears with Asymmetric Teeth
This editor's choice paper investigates tip relief modification as a manner of curtailing wear of wind turbine gearboxes.

A Knowledge Component Framework for Enhancing Transdisciplinary Knowledge Assimilation
Transdisciplinary research literature clearly argues for development of strategies that transcend any one given discipline and that enhance research collaboration. A new framework, coined Recombinant kNowledge Assimilation (RNA), was successfully applied recursively to abstracts from research manuscripts. Using RNA, disciplinary and transdisciplinary knowledge components and context were systematically discovered creating a mechanism to interact with dynamically changing research knowledge and assimilating it to form explicit new knowledge while simultaneously retaining the causal pedigree captured during manuscript processing.

Probabilistic Techniques in Bio-Engineering -- A Review
In order to account for variability and uncertainty in geometry, material properties, kinematic and dynamics of biological tissue, probabilistic analysis methods are being increasingly applied in biomechanics and orthopedics. These methods have been applied in kinematics, joint mechanics, musculoskeletal modeling and representations of subject geometry. These methods could have impact in implant design, gait mechanics, design treatment regimes, structural reliability and prediction of injury.

RE: Oh and Ashton-Miller: Comments on Hashemi et al. "Increasing Pre-Activation of the Quadriceps Muscle Protects the Anterior Cruciate Ligament during the Landing Phase of a Jump: An In Vitro Simulation"
Response to concerns regarding methods used in previous research, particularly the constraint on the ankle.

Reaction Dynamics of Aluminum-Viton-Acetone Droplets
Fundamentally understanding the reaction dynamics of acetone, Viton and aluminum is useful for not only consolidating reactants, but also for the potential to use nanometric aluminum particles in liquid combustion applications. The objective of this study is to examine acetone-Viton droplet burning as a function of aluminum particle size and concentration.

Stochastic Finite Element Approach in Low Cervical Spine for Increasing Analysis Reliability
A non-linear finite element model of C5-C6 motions segment was created and validated based on experimental data and a published FE model under various loading conditions. Through the stochastic (random field) approach, it was concluded that a deterministic value or single random variable tends to over-represent variety of biological structures; stochastic approach is vital to minimize the influence of the uncertainties and to achieve the high reliability in analyzing the complex biological structures.

Dr. Lynne Fallwell
Assistant Professor
History

Holocaust Documentaries
This article looks at the past 60 years of Holocaust-related documentaries. The authors discuss a number of related factors surrounding documentaries including purpose, categories, content, theme and memory.

Sequential Art Narrative and the Holocaust
This article reviews Holocaust portrayals in sequential art narratives dating back to the 1940s up to the present day. Works like Art Spiegelman's Maus and graphic novel adaptations of Anne Frank's biography are discussed.

Through the Looking Glass Darkly: Considering Theories of Nazi Film and Concepts of Transgression
This article is an overview of some of the larger trends on Nazi film research and how these theories have dealt with various transgressive aspects.

Dr. Dennis Fehr
Associate Professor
Art

Feeling Lucky?
40 x 64 inches. Ink, Prismacolor, marker. This image is a metaphor for the naïve confidence that some young women feel when they are "blindfolded."

Dr. Jacki Fitzpatrick
Associate Professor
Human Development & Family Studies

Student Engagement Challenges in Teaching about Controversial Issues
The discussion of controversial issues in college classrooms can be challenging for instructors and students. A review of the literature from multiple fields (e.g., art, biology, political science, family studies, architecture) revealed issues relevant to the controversies and typical student reactions (e.g., resistance, inhibition). The authors offer suggestions for addressing the students' reactions that are based on the literature and classroom teaching experiences.

Mr. Raymond Flores
Instructor
Educational Psychology & Leadership

Formative Evaluation of an Adaptive Web-based Learning System
The purpose of this study was to document the processes involved in two phases of formative evaluation of an adaptive web-based system which individualized instruction such as content, interfaces and instructional strategies dependent on two factors: student motivation and prior knowledge.

Dr. Kristi Gaines
Assistant Professor
Design

Evidence-based Classroom Design for Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD): A Comparative Study of the United States and the United Kingdom
Compares the findings of empirical studies conducted in both the UK and the US that assessed the impact of sensory environmental stimuli on the behavior of students with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) in school buildings, conducted analysis of teaching layouts and the sequence of activities in selected school buildings and compiled relevant perceptual information about behavioral reactions to varying sensory stimuli. Provides further understanding of key factors contributing to the quality of the teaching environment in school buildings in both the UK and the US and assists in developing alternative school design guidelines.

Dr. Weimin Gao
Assistant Professor
Environmental Toxicology

Effects of Predator Cues on Pesticide Toxicity: Toward an Understanding of the Mechanisms of the Interaction
Predation stress is an important component for structuring communities and ecosystem processes and typically co-occurs with environmental contaminants. We examined the effects of fish predator (bluegill, Lepomis macrochirus) cues on toxicity of five different pesticides to the freshwater zooplankton, Ceriodaphnia dubia. Our results demonstrate that factors such as pesticide bioavailability, Koc and exposure concentration may be important for predicting the occurrence of synergistic and antagonistic interactions and that patterns were not consistent among pesticides varying in mechanism of toxic action. Furthermore, our results suggest that fully understanding how ecological stressors may interact with organic contaminants may best be achieved by examination at toxicokinetic and toxicodynamic scales.

Dr. John Gilliam
Assistant Professor
Applied & Professional Studies

Measuring the Perception of Financial Risk Tolerance: A Tale of Two Measures
The assessment of financial risk tolerance is vital in managing investors' expectations of portfolio volatility. Risk-tolerance assessment affects portfolio allocation decisions and is therefore an essential element in investors' goal attainment. This study examines whether investors' perception of financial risk tolerance can predict their behavior as evidenced by portfolio allocation.

Dr. Céline Godard-Codding
Assistant Professor
TIEHH – Environmental Toxicology

Pacific Ocean-wide Profile of CYP1A1 Expression, Stable Carbon and Nitrogen Isotope Ratios and Organic Contaminant Burden in Sperm Whale Skin Biopsies
First Pacific Ocean-wide profile of environmental pollution in threatened sperm whales. Analyses of skin biopsies revealed whales from the Galápagos Islands, a UNESCO World Heritage marine reserve, may have been exposed to higher levels of pollution than whales from other Pacific Ocean locations, including areas closer to continents and industrial or agricultural activities.

Dr. Sara Guengerich
Assistant Professor
Classical & Modern Languages & Literatures

'Vida maridable' and Marriage Fictions in Early Colonial Peru: Andean Noble Women and Their Spanish Husbands
This analysis of interracial legal unions in early colonial Peru challenges the overarching paradigm of the victimization of Indian women, at least within the context of marriage relationships. By exploring the notion of cohabitation (or vida maridable) from the perspective of an Andean wife, a Spanish husband and the people around them, Guengerich's research suggests that a marriage, even fictive, made possible for both individuals to advance their own agendas and to rise in colonial society.

Dr. Saif Haq
Associate Professor
Architecture

Architecture of Wide Open Spaces
Description of architectural quality in open spaces of West Texas.

Examining the 'Sharp End': Evidence-based Knowledge and Design Decision Making
Investigation of the use of research-based evidence in the architectural studio process.

The Research-design Interaction: Lessons Learned From an Evidence-based Design Studio
Investigation of the role of research-based evidence in the architectural phase of hospital design.

Dr. William "Bill" L. Hase
Professor
Chemistry

Chemical Dynamics Simulations of CO2 in the Ground and First Excited Bend States Colliding with a Perfluorinated Self-assembled Monolayer
Energy transfer in collisions of CO2, in the ground (0000) state and first excited (0110) bend state, with a perfluorinated alkanethiol self-assembled monolayer (F-SAM) was studied by quasiclassical trajectory simulations employing a united-atom (UA) model to represent the F-SAM. The CO2 molecule was aimed perpendicularly to the surface at incident energies of 1.6 and 10.6 kcal/mol. The exchange of bend energy is more efficient for penetrating trajectories while almost no energy exchange was found for direct trajectories. Bend energy transfer depends on the surface residence time (Ʈ). In particular, the average bend energy of the scattered CO2 molecules increases linearly with Ʈ for CO2(0000) + F-SAM and it decreases linearly for CO2(0110) + F-SAM at both incident energies. For the highest collision energy, the average bend energy of the scattered CO2 molecules also increases linearly with the angle formed between the molecular axis and the axis perpendicular to the surface in CO2(0000) + F-SAM collisions. The J quantum number distributions P(J) of the scattered CO2 molecules in the (0000) and (0110) states compare very well with experimental results of CO2 scattering off a perfluorinated liquid surface. Finally, the computed vibrational populations also compare well with the experimental distributions, providing vibrational temperatures below the surface temperature. The analysis of the computed vibrational temperatures as a function of the residence time provide us with a value of 50 ps for the time scale needed to achieve vibrational energy accommodation.

Comparisons of Classical and Wigner Sampling of Transition State Energy Levels for Quasiclassical Trajectory Chemical Dynamics Simulations
Quasiclassical trajectory calculations are compared, with classical and Wigner sampling of transition state (TS) energy levels, for C2 H5 F->HF+ C2 H4 product energy partitioning and [Cl CH3 Cl] – central barrier dynamics. The calculations with Wigner sampling are reported here for comparison with the previously reported calculations with classical sampling.

Electronic Structure Theory Study of the F-+ CH3I->FCH3 + I- Potential Energy Surface
MP2 and DFT electronic structure theories, with the functionals OPBE, OLYP, HCTH407, BhandH and B97-1 for the latter, were used to investigate stationary point properties on the F-+ CH3I->FCH3 + I- potential energy surface (PES). The aug-cc-pVDZ and aug-cc-pVTZ basis sets for C, H and F, with Wadt and Hay’s 3s3p valence basis and an effective core potential (ECP) for iodine, were employed for both MP2 and DFT. Singlepoint CCSD(T) calculations were also performed to obtain the complete basis set (CBS) limit for the stationary point energies. The CCSD(T)/CBS reaction exothermicity is only 5.0 kJ/mol different than the experimental value. MP2 and DFT do not predict the same stationary points on the PES. MP2 predicts the C3v F-―CH3I and FCH3―I- ion-dipole complexes and traditional [F―CH3―I]- central barrier as stationary points, as well as a Cs hydrogen-bonded F- ―HCH2I complex and a [F―HCH2―I]- transition state connecting this latter complex to the F-―CH3I complex. A CCSD(T)/CBS relaxed potential energy curve, calculated for the MP2 structures, shows that going from the F-―CH3I complex to the [F―CH3―I]- TS is a barrierless process, indicating these two structures are not stationary points. This is also suggested by the DFT calculations. The structures and frequencies for CH3I and CH3Cl given by MP2 and DFT are in overall good agreement with experiment. The calculations reported here indicate that the DFT/B97―1 functional gives the overall best agreement with the CCSD(T) energies, with a largest difference of only 7.5 kJ/mol for the FCH3―I- complex.

Erratum: Comparisons of Classical and Wigner Sampling of Transition State Energy Levels for Quasiclassical Trajectory Chemical Dynamics Simulations (Journal of Chemical Physics (2010) 133 (044313))
Correction to typographical errors on previous article.

Fragmentation and Reactivity in Collisions of Protonated Diglycine with Chemically Modified Perfluorinated Alkylthiolate-self-assembled Monolayer Surfaces
Direct dynamics simulations are reported for quantum mechanical (QM)/molecular mechanical (MM) trajectories of N-protonated diglycine (gly2-H+) colliding with chemically modified perfluorinated octanethiolate self-assembled monolayer (SAM) surfaces. The RM1 semiempirical theory is used for the QM component of the trajectories. RM1 activation and reaction energies were compared with those determined from higher-level ab initio theories. Two chemical modifications are considered in which a head group (-COCl or -CHO) is substituted on the terminal carbon of a single chain of the SAM. These surfaces are designated as the COCl- SAM and CHO-SAM, respectively. Fragmentation, peptide reaction with the SAM, and covalent linkage of the peptide or its fragments with the SAM surface are observed. Peptide fragmentation via concerted CH2-CO bond breakage is the dominant pathway for both surfaces. HCl formation is the dominant species produced by reaction with the COCl-SAM, while for the CHO-SAM a concerted H-atom transfer from the CHO-SAM to the peptide combined with either a H-atom or radical transfer from the peptide to the surface to form singlet reaction products is the dominant pathway. A strong collision energy dependence is found for the probability of peptide fragmentation, its reactivity, and linkage with the SAM. Surface deposition, i.e., covalent linkage between the surface and the peptide, is compared to recent experimental observations of such bonding by Laskin and co-workers [Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 10, 1512 (2008)]. Qualitative differences in reactivity are seen between the COCl-SAM and CHO-SAM showing that chemical identity is important for surface reactivity. The probability of reactive surface deposition, which is most closely analogous to experimental observables, peaks at a value of around 20% for a collision energy of 50 eV.

Higher-accuracy Schemes for Approximating the Hessian from Electronic Structure Calculations in Chemical Dynamics Simulations
In this paper, we present a family of generally applicable schemes for updating the Hessian from electronic structure calculations based on an equation derived with compact finite difference (CFD). The CFD-based equation is of higher accuracy than the quasi-Newton equation on which existing generally applicable Hessian update schemes are based. Direct tests of Hessian update schemes, as well as dynamics simulations using an integrator incorporating Hessian update schemes, have shown four of the new schemes produce reliably higher accuracy than existing Hessian update schemes.

Intermolecular Potentials for Simulations of Collisions of SiNCS+ and (CH3)2SiNCS+ Ions with Fluorinated Self-assembled Monolayers
Analytical potential energy functions were developed for interactions of SiNCS+ and (CH3)2SiNCS+ ions with perfluorinated self-assembled monolayer (F-SAM) surfaces. Two model compounds were used to represent an F-SAM: CF4 and nine chains of perfluorobutane forming a miniSAM structure. Density functional theory plus dispersion (DFT-D) calculations were carried out to compute intermolecular potential energy curves (IPECs) for these systems. The applied DFT-D method (specifically, B97-D) was successfully tested against high-level wave function calculations performed on the smallest system investigated. The IPECs calculated at the B97-D level were fitted to analytical potentials of the Buckingham type. The calculations show that the parameters obtained from the fits involving CF4 are transferable to the miniSAM system, provided the fittings are conducted with caution, thus corroborating that CF4 is a good model for parameterizing intermolecular potentials for interactions of gases with F-SAM surfaces.

Model Non-equilibrium Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Heat Transfer from a Hot Gold Surface to an Alkylthiolate Self-assembled Monolayer
Model non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are presented of heat transfer from a hot Au {111} substrate to an alkylthiolate self-assembled monolayer (H-SAM) to assist in obtaining an atomic-level understanding of experiments by Wang et al. Different models are considered to determine how they affect the heat transfer dynamics. They include temperature equilibrated (TE) and temperature gradient (TG) thermostat models for the Au(s) surface, and soft and stiff S/Au(s) models for bonding of the S-atoms to the Au(s) surface. A detailed analysis of the non-equilibrium heat transfer at the heterogeneous interface is presented.

F-+ CH3I->FCH3 + I- Reaction Dynamics. Nontraditional Atomistic Mechanisms and Formation of a Hydrogen-bonded Complex
Ion imaging experiments and direct chemical dynamics simulations were performed to study the atomic-level dynamics for the F-+ CH3I->FCH3 + I- SN2 nucleophilic substitution reaction at 0.32 eV collision energy. The simulations reproduce the product energy partitionings and the velocity scattering angle distribution measured in the experiments. The simulations reveal that the substitution reaction occurs by two direct atomic-level mechanisms, that is, rebound and stripping, and an indirect mechanism. Approximately 90 percent of the indirect events occur via a prereaction F--HCH2I hydrogen-bonded complex. This mechanism may play an important role for other F- SN2 reactions due to the strong electronegativity of fluorine. The average product energy partitioning for the F- + CH3I indirect mechanism agrees with the prediction of PST, even though a FCH3 - I- postreaction complex is not formed.

Singlet and Triplet Potential Surfaces for the O2+C2H4 Reaction
Electronic structure calculations at the CASSCF and UB3LYP levels of theory with the aug-cc-pVDZ basis set were used to characterize structures, vibrational frequencies, and energies for stationary points on the ground state triplet and singlet O2+C2H4 potential energy surfaces (PESs). Spin-orbit couplings between the PESs were calculated using state averaged CASSCF wave functions. More accurate energies were obtained for the CASSCF structures with the MRMP2/aug-cc-pVDZ method. An important and necessary aspect of the calculations was the need to use different CASSCF active spaces for the different reaction paths on the investigated PESs. The CASSCF calculations focused on O2+C2H4 addition to form the C2H4O2 biradical on the triplet and singlet surfaces, and isomerization reaction paths ensuing from this biradical. The triplet and singlet C2H4O2 biradicals are very similar in structure, primarily differing in their C-C-O-O dihedral angles. The MRMP2 values for the O2+C2H4->C2H4O2 barrier to form the biradical are 33.8 and 6.1 kcal/mol, respectively, for the triplet and singlet surfaces. On the singlet surface, C2H4O2 isomerizes to dioxetane and ethaneperoxide with MRMP2 barriers of 7.8 and 21.3 kcal/mol. A more exhaustive search of reaction paths was made for the singlet surface using the UB3LYP/aug-cc-pVDZ theory. The triplet and singlet surfaces cross between the structures for the O2+C2H4 addition transition states and the biradical intermediates. Trapping in the triplet biradical intermediate, following 3O2+C2H4 addition, is expected to enhance triplet->singlet intersystem crossing.

Dr. Javad Hashemi
Adjunct Professor
Mechanical Engineering

Increasing Pre-activation of the Quadriceps Muscle Protects the Anterior Cruciate Ligament during the Landing Phase of a Jump: An In Vitro Simulation
We hypothesize that application of an unopposed quadriceps force coupled with an impulsive ground reaction force may induce anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. This situation is similar to landing from a jump if only the quadriceps muscle is active; an unlikely but presumably dangerous circumstance. The purpose of this study was to test our hypothesis using in vitro simulation of jump landing. A jump-landing simulator was utilized. Nine cadaveric knees were tested at an initial flexion angle of 20 degrees.

Influence of Storage Duration on Retention of Original Fracture Toughness
Often when bone properties are measured experimentally for the prediction of failure and the development of injury treatment protocols, bone specimens have to be chemically preserved prior to or during testing; degradation of properties due to preservation methods may lead to incorrect reporting of values of the bone properties. A salient question is, therefore, whether the preservation of bovine cortical bone in ethanol for extended periods of time affects fracture toughness; and if so, whether that is reversible.

RE: Oh and Ashton-Miller: Comments on Hashemi et al. "Increasing Pre-Activation of the Quadriceps Muscle Protects the Anterior Cruciate Ligament during the Landing Phase of a Jump: An In Vitro Simulation"
Response to concerns regarding methods used in previous research, particularly the constraint on the ankle.

Dr. Karlos Hill
Assistant Professor
History

Black Vigilantism: The Rise and Decline of African American Lynch Mob Activity in the Mississippi and Arkansas Deltas, 1883-1923
This article explores the phenomenon of black lynch mob violence in the Delta, which emerged in the late 1870s and 1880s. The Mississippi and Arkansas Deltas were characterized by rampant violence and a legal system that was increasingly unresponsive to crimes perpetuated against blacks. Rape and murder were the predominant allegations that precipitated black lynch mob violence, which suggests that blacks believed those particular crimes warranted lynching. The 1880s represented the peak period for black lynch mob violence. However, by the 1890s, lynching had become racialized, with blacks as primary targets of white lynch mob violence. The decline in black lynch mobs after the 1880s is explained as possibly a result of the feeling among blacks that black extralegal violence might have indicated black support for white-on-black lynching and the racist discourses that rationalized it. This decline is introduced as the first evidence for black grassroots resistance to lynching.

Dr. Mark W. Holtz
Professor
Physics

Effect of Cation Symmetry on the Low-Frequency Spectra of Imidazolium Ionic Liquids: OKE and Raman Spectroscopic Measurements and DFT Calculations
This article reports a study of the low-frequency optical Kerr effect and Raman spectra of two imidazolium ionic liquids that differ only in the symmetry of the alkyl substitution on the imidazolium ring of the cation. Density function theory calculations on the isolated ions provide guidance in the assignment of the OKE and Raman spectra in the 0-200 wavenumber region to intermolecular and intramolecular vibrational modes of the liquid.

Dr. Louisa Hope-Weeks
Associate Professor
Chemistry

Aerosolized PLA and PLGA Nanoparticles Enhance Humoral, Mucosal and Cytokine Responses to Hepatitis B Vaccine
Porous poly(L-lactic acid) (PLA) and poly(lacticco- glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles were tested for pulmonary delivery of Hepatitis B vaccine. In particular, the effects of particle size and hydrophobicity on mucosal and cell-mediated immune responses were investigated. Three formulations of PLA and PLGA nanoparticles containing a fixed amount of Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) were prepared by a doubleemulsionsolvent- evaporation method and characterized for surface morphology, charge, size, density and in vitro release. The immune responses were studied by measuring secretory IgA levels in mucosal fluids and quantitating cytokine levels in rat spleen homogenates. This study demonstrates that inhalable nanoparticles of HBsAg produce an enhancement of immune responses.

Asymmetric Aziridination of N-tert-butanesulfinyl Imines with Phenyldiazomethane via Sulfur Ylides
Optically active aziridines were synthesized from the reaction of chiral nonracemic N-tert-butanesulfinyl imines with benzyl-stabilized sulfur ylides, wherein the latter were generated from a rhodium-catalyzed decomposition of phenyldiazomethane (PDM) in the presence of various sulfides. In most cases, the aziridines were formed and isolated in quantitative yield and the 2,3-trans-aziridines were found to predominate over the 2,3-cis-aziridine isomers. The diastereoselectivity between the two trans-aziridines was found to vary significantly, depending upon the solvent and sulfide employed in the reaction.

Enhanced Convective Heat Transfer in Nongas Generating Nanoparticle Thermites
Flame propagation and peak pressure measurements were taken of two nanoscaled thermites using aluminum (Al) fuel and copper oxide (CuO) or nickel oxide (NiO) oxidizers in a confined flame tube apparatus. Thermal equilibrium simulations predict that the Al+CuO reaction exhibits high gas generation and, thus, high convective flame propagation rates while the Al+NiO reaction produces little to no gas and, therefore, should exhibit much lower flame propagation rates. Results show flame propagation rates ranged between 200 m/s and 600 m/s and peak pressures ranged between 1.7 MPa and 3.7 MPa for both composites. These results were significantly higher than expected for the Al+NiO, which generates virtually no gas. For nanometric Al particles, oxidation has recently been described by a melt-dispersion oxidation mechanism that involves a dispersion of high velocity alumina shell fragments and molten Al droplets that promote a pressure build-up by inducing a bulk movement of fluid. This mechanism unique to nanoparticle reaction may promote convection without the need for additional gas generation.

Gold Modified Cadmium Sulfide Aerogels
Monolithic aerogels composed of cadmium sulfide nanoparticles partially modified with metallic gold (CdS-Au) are reported. The semiconductor-metal nanoparticles are synthesized using an inverse micelle media of Bis- (2-ethylhexyl)sulfosuccinate sodium salt (AOT) in heptane, followed by capping with 4-fluorothiophenol and precipitation with triethylamine. The nanoparticles are then dispersed in acetone and gel formation is achieved using nanoparticle condensation strategy. The resultant CdS-Au aerogel materials are mesoporous, with an interconnected network of semiconductor-metal nanoparticles. A detailed microstructure analysis of the semiconductor-metal aerogels via transmission electron microscopy indicates that the final gold concentration significantly impacts the semiconductor-metal aerogel morphology and porosity.

Influence of Solvent on Porosity and Microstructure of an Yttrium Based Aerogel
Monolithic yttrium-based aerogels and xerogels were prepared by the epoxide addition method. The effects of changing both the gelation solvent and the yttrium salt precursor in the reaction were investigated. The porous morphology of the resulting aerogel materials was investigated using gas adsorption/desorption analysis, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The solvent in which the aerogels were formed was found to significantly impact the porous structure and physical morphology of these materials. The counterion used to synthesize the gels also had a profound impact on gel formation. The chloride salt precursor gave successful gels while the nitrate salt gave only precipitates. The yttrium-based xerogels synthesized were annealed at various temperatures in static air, nitrogen and oxygen atmospheres. The annealed materials were analyzed using powder X-ray diffraction. The amorphous as-synthesized material is found to form the stoichiometric yttrium oxide by way of an oxygen deficient yttrium oxide species which is black in color.

Monolithic CuO-NiO Aerogels via an Epoxide Addition Route
In this report we demonstrate the synthesis of monolithic mixed copper(II)-nickel(II) (Cu-Ni) oxide aerogels using the epoxide addition method. This single step synthetic method provides a straightforward route to synthesize highly porous CuO-NiO materials composed of nanometer sized particles. Control of the particle size and gel morphology is achieved by simple changes in the initial synthetic conditions. The as-synthesized Cu-Ni aerogels were identified as being highly amorphous with the crystalline species identified as a copper/nickel chloride hydroxide. Calcination of the aerogel materials at relatively low temperatures resulted in a complete phase transition of the material to give the CuO-NiO aerogel. The aerogels were characterized by high resolution scanning electron microscopy (HR-SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), powder Xray diffraction (XRD) and nitrogen adsorption/desorption techniques (BET). The as-synthesized Cu-Ni aerogels are highly porous and exhibited high surface areas (~400 m2/g).

PLGA Microparticles Encapsulating Prostaglandin E1-Hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (PGE1-HPβCD) Complex for the Treatment of Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension (PAH)
Purpose: To test the efficacy and viability of poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microspheres encapsulating an inclusion complex of prostaglandin E1 (PGE1) and 2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HPβCD) for pulmonary delivery of PGE1 for treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), a disease of pulmonary circulation. Results: Incorporation of HPβCD in the microparticles resulted in development of large particles with internal pores, which, despite large mean diameters, had aerodynamic diameters in the inhalable range of 1 to 5 μm. HPβCD incorporation also resulted in a significant increase in the amount of drug released in vitro in simulated interstitial lung fluid, showing a desirable burst release profile required for immediate hemodynamic effects. Compared to plain PLGA microparticles, entrapment efficiency was decreased upon complexation with HPβCD. In vivo absorption profile indicated prolonged availability of PGE1 in circulation following pulmonary administration of the optimized microparticulate formulations, with an extended half-life of almost 4 hours. Metabolic degradation and acute toxicity studies suggested that microparticulate formulations were stable under physiological conditions and safe for the lungs and respiratory epithelium. Conclusions: This study demonstrates the feasibility of PGE1-HPβCD complex encapsulated in PLGA microparticles as a potential delivery system for controlled release of inhaled PGE1.

Preparation of Porous Manganese Oxide Nanomaterials by One-pot Synthetic Sol-gel Method
For the first time, the simple epoxide addition, sol-gel method has been employed to successfully prepare porous, high surface area manganese (II) aerogel nanomaterials. These uniform materials can then undergo calcination at relatively low temperature to selectively yield the mixed-valent Mn3O4 complex illustrating both an ease of preparation and synthesis versatility.

A Supramolecular Approach to Zwitterionic Alkaline Metal Silanides and Formation of Heterobimetallic Silanides
Incorporating pendant polydonor groups is key to the synthesis and isolation of a series of novel and truly zwitterionic alkaline metal silanides of formula {Si[SiMe2O(CH2)nOMe]3}M (n = 2, 3; M = Li, Na, K) that can easily be converted into heterobimetallic silanides.

Dr. John Howe
Professor
History

Did St. Peter Damian Die in 1073? A New Perspective on His Final Days.
The commonly accepted assertion that S. Peter Damian died Feb. 22, 1072, lacks decisive evidence. Changing his obituary to the year 1073 helps to explain his possible presence at a placitum held July 7, 1072, and at a dedication of the church Oct. 21, 1072. This move also helps to clarify the chronology of the arrival of the Archbishop of Ravenna Guibert of Ostia and Cardinal Gerald. Such a change sheds new light on the church reformers operating in early 1070.

Re-forging the 'Age of Iron' Part I: The Tenth Century as the End of the Ancient World?
The 10th century, once dismissed as an unpleasant "Age of Iron," now receives increased attention as an important age of transition. Historians are attempting to understand how it fits into the broader narrative of Western Civilization.

Re-forging the 'Age of Iron' Part II
The 10th century, once dismissed as an unpleasant "Age of Iron," now receives increased attention as an important age of transition. Historians are attempting to understand how it fits into the broader narrative of Western Civilization.

Dr. Jon Hufford
Librarian
Libraries

Continuous Assessment, the Catalyst for Building a Successful Information Literacy Program that Focuses on Student Needs
Assessment, and in particular student-learning assessment, has become a crucial step in the process of continuously developing and improving Texas Tech University Libraries' Information Literacy program. This paper reviews developments in the program, training for the librarians who participate in the program, the outreach and collaboration efforts to expand the program and the important role that assessment plays in the process of discovering student needs, improving content, teaching, learning and the operation of the program. The emphasis is on assessment as a catalyst in the process of continually improving the Information Literacy program.

Dr. Shelby Hunt
Jerry S. Rawls and P. W. Horn Professor
Marketing

Legends in Marketing: Shelby Hunt (Ten-Volume Set)
Legends in Marketing is a series that provides insight and historical perspective into some of the greatest marketing thinkers of the 20th century. It reproduces the seminal works of each legend and includes an interview section in which the volume editors pose questions to the legend on his research and the future of the discipline. In addition, researchers in the field provide a critical perspective on the articles in the volumes.

Dr. Mary Jane Hurst
Professor
English

Language, Gender and Community in Late Twentieth-Century Fiction: American Voices and American Identities
This book establishes the centrality of language, gender and community in the quest for identity that is the central theme of contemporary American fiction.

Dr. Fethi Inan
Assistant Professor
Educational Psychology & Leadership

Formative Evaluation of an Adaptive Web-based Learning System
The purpose of this study was to document the processes involved in two phases of formative evaluation of an adaptive web-based system which individualized instruction such as content, interfaces and instructional strategies dependent on two factors: student motivation and prior knowledge.

Dr. Clemens Krempner
Assistant Professor
Chemistry

A Supramolecular Approach to Zwitterionic Alkaline Metal Silanides and Formation of Heterobimetallic Silanides
Incorporating pendant polydonor groups is key to the synthesis and isolation of a series of novel and truly zwitterionic alkaline metal silanides of formula {Si[SiMe2O(CH2)nOMe]3}M (n = 2, 3; M = Li, Na, K) that can easily be converted into heterobimetallic silanides.

Dr. Mellinee Lesley
Associate Professor
Curriculum & Instruction

Understanding Resistance: Pre-service Teachers’ Discourse Models of Struggling Readers and School Literacy Tasks
In this study, I examined pre-service teachers' a priori Discourse models about reading (Gee, 2005). Gee defined Discourse models as the "largely unconscious theories" individuals hold about "texts and the world" that shape their actions (p. 71).

Dr. Miguel Levario
Assistant Professor
History

The Rise of the Mexican Nemesis: Retribution, Militarization and Race in West Texas and Southern New Mexico
This paper, presented at the March meeting of the Organization of American Historians, is a continuation of my research of the U.S-Mexican Border. The paper explores the rise of tensions of the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

Dr. Guigen Li
Professor
Chemistry

Human Transcriptome Analysis Reveals a Potential Role for Active Transport in the Metabolism of Pseudomonas Aeruginosa Autoinducers
The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa employs acyl homoserine lactones (AHL) as signaling compounds to regulate virulence gene expression via quorum sensing. The AHL N-3-oxo-dodecanoyl-lhomoserine lactone (3OC12-HSL) also induces mammalian cell responses, including apoptosis and immune modulation. In certain cell types, the apoptotic effects of 3OC12-HSL are mediated via a calcium-dependent signaling pathway, while some pro-inflammatory effects involve intracellular transcriptional regulators. However, the mechanisms by which mammalian cells perceive and respond to 3OC12-HSL are still not completely understood. Here, we used microarray analysis to investigate the transcriptional response of human lung epithelial cells after exposure to 3OC12-HSL.

Dr. Micah Meixner Logan
TEACH Program Lead Consultant
Teaching, Learning & Technology Center

Growing a New Generation: Promoting Self-reflection through Peer Observation
Many faculty developers understand the value of self-reflection in effective teaching and aim to cultivate the practice in their programming. However, many instructors regard peer observation as punitive or evaluative in nature. This chapter outlines a model of group peer observation implemented in a graduate student development program that transforms that negative perception, instead supporting introspection and community. We discuss how the process promotes a culture of open-door teaching across disciplines and emphasizes the importance of reflective practice in individual change and teaching improvement, and how faculty developers from institutions and programs of all sizes can help nurture that growth.

Dr. Aretha Marbley
Professor
Educational Psychology & Leadership

African American Women Administrators in Academe: Transgressing Multiple Marginality
This chapter focuses on African American women administrators and the formidable challenges as well as the milestones associated with (a) identity and self-definition; (b) marginalization and oppression; and (c) social and professional integration. The use of narrative vignettes will provide "voice" to the experiences of three African American women administrators--two deans in colleges of education and one associate professor who served as a dean of students at a vocational and technical college.

Case Studies of African American Families: Self-reports of Ethnically Diverse Practitioners
Using the lessons learned from mistakes made in their earlier clinical work with African American families, through the lens of Multicultural Counseling and Therapy theory, these culturally diverse practitioners use reflections from those counseling experiences to offer clinicians a people-responsive, diversity-sensitive framework and recommendations for working with African American families in school and community counseling settings.

Ebony Eyes: Teaching about African American Civil War Heroes Through Art
The article provides lesson plans that explore how students can gain knowledge and develop a greater awareness and appreciation of Blacks and the American Civil War through the lenses of art.

Multicultural Counseling: Perspectives from Counselors as Clients of Color
This is a book that is based on real lives, aimed to identify the major issues that influence the experiences of people of color with mental health services. This is the first book to explore the experiences of people of color in counseling from the perspective of individuals who are practicing counselors and were previously clients in counseling themselves.

Teaching Diversity across Disciplines: Reflections from African-American Faculty in Four Different Academic Settings
The authors, male and female African-American faculty from different academic disciplines at predominantly white institutions (PWIs), share personal reflections on the laborious experiences teaching postsecondary graduate and professional courses that focus on diversity and multicultural themes. The article will provide tools and strategies for improving the overall effectiveness for those who teach diversity courses from a framework the authors have codified as a 3-C perspective: context, characters and curriculum.

Teaching Social and Cultural Issues in Counseling
In this chapter, a convention-challenging, experiential approach to teaching culture and counseling will be introduced. Four central notions must precede this foray. First, culture is broadly defined. It includes the traditional notions from anthropology of ethnicity and race. But it also includes groupings such as disability, gender, age, social class, sexual orientation and religion.

Three Issues, Three Approaches, Three Calls to Action: Multicultural Social Justice in the Schools
This article provides case studies, statistics and social justice advocacy as lenses to discuss three areas related to multicultural social justice in school settings. Each case study is followed by a reflection on the authors' experiences. The article culminates with suggestions, guidelines and recommendations for applying social justice advocacy to the school setting.

Undergraduate Readiness for Diversity
This is an entry in the Encyclopedia of Diversity in Education (James A. Banks, Ed.).

Write This Down
This is an afterword to the book Remembrances in Black: Personal Perspectives of the African American Experience at the University of Arkansas 1940s - 2000s (C.F. Robinson II and L.R. Williams, Eds.).

Dr. Jonathan Maul
Assistant Professor
Environmental Toxicology

Effects of Predator Cues on Pesticide Toxicity: Toward an Understanding of the Mechanisms of the Interaction
Predation stress is an important component for structuring communities and ecosystem processes and typically co-occurs with environmental contaminants. We examined the effects of fish predator (bluegill, Lepomis macrochirus) cues on toxicity of five different pesticides to the freshwater zooplankton, Ceriodaphnia dubia. Our results demonstrate that factors such as pesticide bioavailability, Koc and exposure concentration may be important for predicting the occurrence of synergistic and antagonistic interactions and that patterns were not consistent among pesticides varying in mechanism of toxic action. Furthermore, our results suggest that fully understanding how ecological stressors may interact with organic contaminants may best be achieved by examination at toxicokinetic and toxicodynamic scales.

Dr. Michael Mayer
Associate Professor
Chemistry

Asymmetric Aziridination of N-tert-butanesulfinyl Imines with Phenyldiazomethane via Sulfur Ylides
Optically active aziridines were synthesized from the reaction of chiral nonracemic N-tert-butanesulfinyl imines with benzyl-stabilized sulfur ylides, wherein the latter were generated from a rhodium-catalyzed decomposition of phenyldiazomethane (PDM) in the presence of various sulfides. In most cases, the aziridines were formed and isolated in quantitative yield and the 2,3-trans-aziridines were found to predominate over the 2,3-cis-aziridine isomers. The diastereoselectivity between the two trans-aziridines was found to vary significantly, depending upon the solvent and sulfide employed in the reaction.

Dr. Monte Monroe
Associate Archivist
Libraries

West Texas Historical Association Yearbook
The yearbook is the yearly scholarly publication of the West Texas Historical Association. It publishes articles on a variety of subjects concerned with the history of West Texas. The 2011 yearbook included articles on oil patch music, West Texas crimes, the Big Bend area and prohibition.

Dr. Seiichi Nagihara
Associate Professor
Geosciences

Characterization of the Sedimentary Thermal Regime Along the Corsair Growth-fault Zone, Texas Continental Shelf, Using Corrected Bottomhole Temperatures
A mapping study of temperature distribution in deep sedimentary rocks off the Texas Coast. It is pertinent to understanding the origin and migration of petroleum in the area.

Dr. Bolanle Olaniran
Professor
Communication Studies

Challenges Facing the Semantic Web and Social Software as Communication Technology Agents in Elearning Environments
The semantic web describes the process where information content is made available for machine consumption. With increased reliance on information communication technologies, in particular, the semantic web, which promises effective and efficient information acquisition and dissemination about products and services in the global economy. In spite of the semantic web promises, certain challenges face the realization of these goals. The paper addresses some key challenges that include technological and social cultural issues. The paper also discusses specific implications relating to the direction of the semantic web.

New Trends in ICTs and Computer Assisted Language Learning (CALL)
The chapter presents culture and new trends in ICTs for L2 learning. Specific modality, challenges and issues for future considerations in L2 learning are discussed. The chapter argues for the need to understand culture and contextual appropriateness of L2 learning in ICT environments. Finally, the chapter contends that ICTs are best relegated as a supplemental role or tools, rather than as an outright substitute for traditional L2 learning and curricula.

Dr. Rebecca Ortiz
Assistant Professor
Education

Alternative Teacher Certification Program and Diversity in the Schools
Dual tensions in the classroom provide the impetus for this research—one for highly qualified teachers who promote all students’ success, including those from diverse backgrounds; the other—for teachers who are in short supply, particularly in science, math, special education and bilingual education. The alternative certification programs (ACP) route of credentialing educators is now mainstream and, therefore not “alternative”; however, it is difficult to discern the effectiveness of the AC Programs or the individuals who have completed them.

Dr. Michelle Pantoya
Professor
Mechanical Engineering

Engineering Elephants
Engineering Elephants is a children's book introducing the engineering profession and fundamental science and engineering concepts to young children (Pre K-5th). The story chronicles the journey of an elephant questioning the world around him. Do engineers make elephants?

Enhanced Convective Heat Transfer in Nongas Generating Nanoparticle Thermites
Flame propagation and peak pressure measurements were taken of two nanoscaled thermites using aluminum (Al) fuel and copper oxide (CuO) or nickel oxide (NiO) oxidizers in a confined flame tube apparatus. Thermal equilibrium simulations predict that the Al+CuO reaction exhibits high gas generation and, thus, high convective flame propagation rates while the Al+NiO reaction produces little to no gas and, therefore, should exhibit much lower flame propagation rates. Results show flame propagation rates ranged between 200 m/s and 600 m/s and peak pressures ranged between 1.7 MPa and 3.7 MPa for both composites. These results were significantly higher than expected for the Al+NiO, which generates virtually no gas. For nanometric Al particles, oxidation has recently been described by a melt-dispersion oxidation mechanism that involves a dispersion of high velocity alumina shell fragments and molten Al droplets that promote a pressure build-up by inducing a bulk movement of fluid. This mechanism unique to nanoparticle reaction may promote convection without the need for additional gas generation.

Nanoscale Investigation of Surfaces Exposed to a Thermite Spray
A thermite spray gun was developed to examine the reaction's potential to penetrate a metal surface. This mini-torch was shown to be highly effective for micron particle fuel and oxidizer mixtures but nano-particles are not as effective for generating reactions that enable penetration through a substrate.

Reaction Dynamics of Aluminum-Viton-Acetone Droplets
Fundamentally understanding the reaction dynamics of acetone, Viton and aluminum is useful for not only consolidating reactants, but also for the potential to use nanometric aluminum particles in liquid combustion applications. The objective of this study is to examine acetone-Viton droplet burning as a function of aluminum particle size and concentration.

Ms. Freedonia Paschall
Archivist
Libraries

West Texas Historical Association Yearbook
The yearbook is the yearly scholarly publication of the West Texas Historical Association. It publishes articles on a variety of subjects concerned with the history of West Texas. The 2011 yearbook included articles on oil patch music, West Texas crimes, the Big Bend area and prohibition.

Ms. Arlene Paschel
Assistant Librarian
Libraries

Continuous Assessment, the Catalyst for Building a Successful Information Literacy Program that Focuses on Student Needs
Assessment, and in particular student-learning assessment, has become a crucial step in the process of continuously developing and improving Texas Tech University Libraries' Information Literacy program. This paper reviews developments in the program, training for the librarians who participate in the program, the outreach and collaboration efforts to expand the program and the important role that assessment plays in the process of discovering student needs, improving content, teaching, learning and the operation of the program. The emphasis is on assessment as a catalyst in the process of continually improving the Information Literacy program.

IMPS: Innovations, Mobility and Personalized Service
Innovations, mobility and personalized services (IMPS) have significantly changed the way we do business in libraries. From the era of "library as place" and librarian "behind the desk," students and faculty have moved to accessing library resources anytime, anywhere. Librarians are incorporating IMPS into websites and pedagogy, but they are presented with a balancing act between technologically adept students and their oftentimes less technologically proficient professors.

Social Media and Social Events for Effective Outreach to our Client Base
Information and Communications Technologies have significantly changed the way we do business in libraries. From the era of library as a place, we have since moved to an anytime, anywhere access to credible resources. Librarians bridge the gap between students who are more technologically adept than their instructors and or faculty members presenting thus an interesting balancing act. This poster focuses on new and innovative ways of utilizing social media and social events to facilitate information literacy components into websites and pedagogies, technologies students are familiar with but don't think critically about it. Facebook, Myspace, podcasts, audio mashups, wikis, book trailers, QR Codes, etc., are examined in context. Social events such as FACE, faculty meetings, coffee hours, research conferences, workshops, club meetings, etc., present great opportunities for socializing, networking and teachable moments to get our information literacy message across in a convivial atmosphere.

Dr. Tyge Payne
Associate Professor of Strategic Management
Rawls College of Business

University Life: A College Survival Story
The first year of college can be challenging. Most universities now offer, and often require, freshmen orientation courses to educate new students in ways to be more successful in college. University Life: A College Survival Story is intended to help facilitate this education. This full-length graphic novel discusses a number of issues from drugs and financial problems to stress and depression. While directed at contemporary college students, high school seniors preparing for college (and their parents) might also find the book appealing.

Dr. Rosemary Peggram
Instructor in Interior Design
Design

Habitat and Interior Design: A Service-Learning Partnership
Habitat for Humanity needed new and different floor plan arrangements and sizes to offer to Lubbock families. Interior Design sophomores needed to learn residential design, so a service-learning partnership emerged. Habitat provided the specific requirements and three interior design studios produced 38 different solutions in square footage, number of bedrooms and room configurations. The students received a vast amount of information on residential design, space planning and experience working with a real client while Habitat received new ideas and plans free of charge. What a win-win situation.

Dr. Comfort Pratt
Assistant Professor
Education

Ebony Eyes: Teaching about African American Civil War Heroes Through Art
The article provides lesson plans that explore how students can gain knowledge and develop a greater awareness and appreciation of Blacks and the American Civil War through the lenses of art.

Dr. Steven M. Presley
Associate Professor
Environmental Toxicology

Effects of Predator Cues on Pesticide Toxicity: Toward an Understanding of the Mechanisms of the Interaction
Predation stress is an important component for structuring communities and ecosystem processes and typically co-occurs with environmental contaminants. We examined the effects of fish predator (bluegill, Lepomis macrochirus) cues on toxicity of five different pesticides to the freshwater zooplankton, Ceriodaphnia dubia. Our results demonstrate that factors such as pesticide bioavailability, Koc and exposure concentration may be important for predicting the occurrence of synergistic and antagonistic interactions and that patterns were not consistent among pesticides varying in mechanism of toxic action. Furthermore, our results suggest that fully understanding how ecological stressors may interact with organic contaminants may best be achieved by examination at toxicokinetic and toxicodynamic scales.

Dr. Narissra Punyanunt-Carter
Associate Professor of Communication Studies
Communication Studies

A Quantitative Analysis of Political Affiliation, Religiosity, and Religious-based Communication
This article focuses on examining specific hypothesized differences in relation to religious ideology, political affiliation and communication.

Dr. Marjean Purinton
Associate Dean of Honors and Professor of English
Honors College & English

The City as Portal: Late Georgian Women on the Stage and in the Public Sphere
This essay examines the way in which a rapidly changing and cosmopolitan London functioned as a kind of "stage" upon which women from the middling classes could perform during appropriately public entertainments. The essay points to how these bourgeois "women of the street" complicated the perceived perceptions of women performing on the public stage. A feminist reading of several late eighteenth-century comedies, the essay demonstrates how the city functioned as a portal, an opening, through which respectable women could enter the public sphere of city life and staged drama.

Lee: the New Science and Female Madness
This essay examines Sophia Lee's 1796 tragedy ALMEYDA: QUEEN OF GRANADA as a cleverly staged critique of late 18th-century science, specifically the practices of "mad doctors" who attempted to control women's bodies by rendering their minds as captive to female biology. The very year that Lee's tragedy was staged at Drury Lane, Mary Lamb committed matricide, bringing the legal and medical question of female madness back into the public consciousness. The essay considers the tragedy's treatment of madness in the context of contemporary male medical discourses about female insanity as well as actual cases of violence perpetuated by women deemed "mad." The handling of female madness in the fictions depicted on the stage, in public events and in medical treatises meant that mental derangement would never be seen quite the same way by medicine and the courts as it was at the end of the eighteenth century.

Teaching British Romantic Drama: A Senior Seminar in Studies in Drama
This pedagogical essay discusses the ways in which Romantic Drama could be taught as a capstone course for English majors and minors. The essay includes conceptual paradigms for organizing readings and practical, interactive assignments for discussions, discovery activities and writings. This essay represents what has been an ongoing project among Romanticists to recover and relocate the period's drama in the canon, in the classroom and in performance.

Teaching Burney's The Witlings
This essay discusses the pedagogical possibilities of reading Frances Burney's 1779 comedy The Witlings not as an examination of the value of education and learning, but in its historical moment of late 18th-century London (satire on literary clubs such as the Bluestockings and Georgian anxieties about women's reading) and in the context of today's societal discussions (liberal arts education versus job training, the accountability of learning outcomes and assessments to legislative and tax-paying publics, and the value of service learning). The essay also explores the comedy's "feminist" use of domestic spaces or interiorized geographies and "masculinized" timed labor of mass production.

Professor Brian Quinn
Social Sciences Librarian
Libraries

Reducing Psychological Resistance to Digital Repositories
The potential value of digital repositories is dependent on the cooperation of scholars to deposit their work. Although many researchers have been resistant to submitting their work, the literature on digital repositories contains very little research on the psychology of resistance. This article looks at the psychological literature on resistance and explores what its implications might be for reducing the resistance of scholars to submitting their work to digital repositories.

Dr. Edward Quitevis
Professor of Chemistry and Joint Professor of Physics
Chemistry

Effect of Cation Symmetry on the Morphology and Physicochemical Properties of Imidazolium Ionic Liquids
This article reports a study of the effect of cation symmetry on the morphology and physicochemical properties of 1,3-dialkylimidazolium ionic liquids. Small-wide-angle X-ray scattering measurements indicate that the structural heterogeneities are larger in the asymmetric ionic liquid with a methyl group and an (N-1) carbonatom alkyl chain on the imidazolium ring of the cation than in a symmetric ionic liquid with two N/2 carbonatom alkyl chains on the imidazolium ring of the cation. For a symmetric/asymmetric ionic liquid pair with a given N, the viscosity of the asymmetric ionic liquid is greater than that of the symmetry ionic liquid. We discuss in this article how the structural heterogeneities and the physicochemical properties of these ionic liquids are consistent with alkyl tail segregation.

Effect of Cation Symmetry on the Low-Frequency Spectra of Imidazolium Ionic Liquids: OKE and Raman Spectroscopic Measurements and DFT Calculations
This article reports a study of the low-frequency optical Kerr effect and Raman spectra of two imidazolium ionic liquids that differ only in the symmetry of the alkyl substitution on the imidazolium ring of the cation. Density function theory calculations on the isolated ions provide guidance in the assignment of the OKE and Raman spectra in the 0-200 wavenumber region to intermolecular and intramolecular vibrational modes of the liquid.

Dr. Moira Ridley
Professor
Geosciences

A Comparison of Cation Adsorption by Isostructural Rutile and Cassiterite
Experimental and computational tools that probe mineral-water interfacial structure and dynamics at the atomic level have proven to be absolutely necessary in reducing the ambiguity inherent in rationalizing macroscopic ion adsorption data.

Dr. Ann Rodriguez
Visiting Assistant Professor of Mass Communications
Mass Communications

Preserving the National Football League's Family Fan Base: Can Cognitive Flexibility Theory Provide Evidence on How to Effectively Market through a Hypertext and Hypermedia Web Site?
The National Football League (NFL) faces daunting challenges over the next decade as a new generation of media consumers with less knowledge of the NFL brand and more awareness of other sports such as soccer emerges. To maintain and augment its family tradition among this new generation of consumers, this study focused on an examination of the NFL's Rush web site through a structural equation model (SEM) to test Cognitive Flexibility Theory's (CFT) major tenets with attitudinal and behavioral constructs. Participants for this study included 301 parents who browsed through the NFL Rush web site and answered a questionnaire to measure the SEM's constructs. While t values for each path coefficient are statistically significant at the .05 and .0001 two-sided significance level, this research also presents a focal point upon which sports marketers can rely to improve their web site marketing, increase brand knowledge and its transfer from parents to their children.

Mr. Tom Rohrig
Associate Librarian
Libraries

Government Documents en Español
This program identifies Texas and federal information resources in Spanish for personal use and research. The speakers highlight selling points for providing government information to the diverse Hispanic community and offering outreach services.

Service Learning and Academic Librarians: Partners and Collaborators
This workshop will help participants understand the role that academic librarians play in partnering and collaborating with faculty in developing service learning courses. The workshops will use the Texas Tech University Library as a model for such a partnership and include a hands-on exercise in identifying librarian roles in developing a service learning course.

What Has the Government Done for Me Lately? Finding and Using Government Information Online
Finding local, state, regional, federal/national and international government information online.

Professor Wendy Ross
Associate Professor
Law

Teaching Diversity across Disciplines: Reflections from African-American Faculty in Four Different Academic Settings
The authors, male and female African-American faculty from different academic disciplines at predominantly white institutions (PWIs), share personal reflections on the laborious experiences teaching postsecondary graduate and professional courses that focus on diversity and multicultural themes. The article will provide tools and strategies for improving the overall effectiveness for those who teach diversity courses from a framework the authors have codified as a 3-C perspective: context, characters and curriculum.

Dr. Kendra Rumbaugh
Assistant Professor
Surgery

Fatal Attraction: Bacterial Bait Lures Worms to Their Death
During the past decade, the roundworm Caenorhabditis elegans has become a popular model for the study of host/pathogen relationships, leading to a wealth of information about microbial virulence factors and host defense pathways. Although the complicated interactions between C. elegans and the many pathogens that it encounters in the soil have become clearer in recent years, there is still much to learn. What are the cues that worms use to detect food sources? How do worms choose which bacterial species to eat and which to leave alone? Once a pathogen is encountered, what are the microbial killing mechanisms and the nematode's survival mechanisms?

Human Transcriptome Analysis Reveals a Potential Role for Active Transport in the Metabolism of Pseudomonas Aeruginosa Autoinducers
The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa employs acyl homoserine lactones (AHL) as signaling compounds to regulate virulence gene expression via quorum sensing. The AHL N-3-oxo-dodecanoyl-lhomoserine lactone (3OC12-HSL) also induces mammalian cell responses, including apoptosis and immune modulation. In certain cell types, the apoptotic effects of 3OC12-HSL are mediated via a calcium-dependent signaling pathway, while some pro-inflammatory effects involve intracellular transcriptional regulators. However, the mechanisms by which mammalian cells perceive and respond to 3OC12-HSL are still not completely understood. Here, we used microarray analysis to investigate the transcriptional response of human lung epithelial cells after exposure to 3OC12-HSL.

In Vivo Models of Biofilm Infection
This chapter describes the in vivo models currently being used to study different biofilm infections and considers the pros and cons of the approaches used. Although many studies of medical biofilms have used patient samples, such as infected catheters and orthopedic devices, this chapter will focus mainly on nonhuman vertebrate models of biofilm infection with the exception of human models for in vivo oral biofilms.

Microbial Signaling Compounds as Endocrine Effectors
The major focus of this book is how chemical signals, including classic hormones, produced by the mammalian endocrine system alter the behavior of microbes residing in the host. However, it is also apparent that residential and transient microbes also produce signals within a host and that these signals are incorporated into the chemical milieu shared by mammalian and microbial cells. Therefore this chapter will explore the possibility that microbe-derived chemicals can transmit signals to host cells and alter host-cell behavior. We will define the properties expected of a cross-kingdom signal, citing specific examples from the plethora of metabolites, toxins, second messengers and other small chemicals produced by microbes. Furthermore, we will describe published evidence of the potential physiological effects of microbial signals on host cells. In keeping with the classic model of endocrine signaling, we will also discuss potential microbial signal-mammalian receptor interactions.

Perception and Degradation of N-Acyl Homoserine Lactone Quorum Sensing Signals by Mammalian and Plant Cells
Cell-to-cell signaling via small chemical signals is an ancient process shared by most living organisms. Whether these signals are produced by mammals, insects, plants or bacteria and are called hormones, pheromones or autoinducers, they convey vital information about the status of the cell and its extracellular environment. The discovery of bacterial cell-to-cell signaling or quorum sensing (QS) revealed that singlecelled prokaryotic organisms possess sophisticated methods for coordinating their behavior by secreting chemical or peptide signals and ushered in a new field of Microbiology.

Quorum Sensing: Methods and Protocols
Written in the highly successful Methods in Molecular Biology series format, chapters include brief introductions to their respective topics, lists of the necessary materials and reagents, step-by-step, readily reproducible laboratory protocols and expert tips on troubleshooting and avoiding known experimental pitfalls. Comprehensive and cutting-edge, Quorum Sensing: Methods and Protocols serves as an invaluable collection of easily accessible techniques for scientists seeking to further our knowledge about bacterial communication and its relation to humanity.

Dr. Andreas Schneider
Associate Professor
Sociology

Im Rhythmus der Peitsche
Why do people willfully expose themselves to physical pain? How does pain become a positive experience? Investigating these questions in the extremely different areas of religion and sexual practice demonstrates commonalities in the application of a general affective mechanism involved in the rendering of pain.

Symbolic Interactionism: From Gestalt to Cybernetics
This work investigates the roots of Symbolic Interactionism, the different contributions and the newest theoretical developments and applications. It pioneers the extension of the classic dichotomous differentiation between the processes versus structure schools of Symbolic Interactionism by systematically establishing the evidence for a third school of cybernetic Symbolic Interactionism.

Mr. Sean Scully
Instructor
Art

Privateer Service Medal
Privateers were the marauders of the seven seas sanctioned by the crown to conduct the unseemly aspects of empire. Today, private contractors make up a third army in our ongoing wars and serve the vital role of securing our diplomats, persons of interest and enemy combatants. Unlike traditional military personnel, these corporate warriors never receive true recognition for their accomplishments.

Dr. Sonya Sherrod
Executive Administrative Associate
TTUHSC Office of International Affairs

Science and Mathematics Integrated Activities for Middle School
This book contains a series of lesson plans for middle level K-12 classrooms. Each chapter contains three lessons on a particular theme in mathematics and science. There is an introduction to each theme at the beginning of the chapter and additional mathematical background is provided in appendices.

Dr. Victoria Sutton
Paul Whitfield Horn Professor, Director, Center for Biodefense, Law and Public Policy
Law

Toxicological Animal Studies: Disparate Treatment as Scientific Evidence
This article examines the jurisdictionally disparate treatment of toxicological animal studies as evidence and the courts' reasoning for the exclusion or limitation of the toxicological animal studies, explore the potential misunderstandings of the science of toxicology and offer suggestions for more consistently applying the Daubert principles for the admission of scientific evidence to toxicological animal studies.

Dr. Sindee L. Simon
Horn Professor
Chemical Engineering

Effect of Cation Symmetry on the Morphology and Physicochemical Properties of Imidazolium Ionic Liquids
This article reports a study of the effect of cation symmetry on the morphology and physicochemical properties of 1,3-dialkylimidazolium ionic liquids. Small-wide-angle X-ray scattering measurements indicate that the structural heterogeneities are larger in the asymmetric ionic liquid with a methyl group and an (N-1) carbonatom alkyl chain on the imidazolium ring of the cation than in a symmetric ionic liquid with two N/2 carbonatom alkyl chains on the imidazolium ring of the cation. For a symmetric/asymmetric ionic liquid pair with a given N, the viscosity of the asymmetric ionic liquid is greater than that of the symmetry ionic liquid. We discuss in this article how the structural heterogeneities and the physicochemical properties of these ionic liquids are consistent with alkyl tail segregation.

Dr. Douglas Simpson
Professor
Curriculum & Instruction

Teachers, Leaders, and Schools
A collection of John Dewey's most relevant essays on educational theory and practice for 21st century educators.

Dr. Mohan Sridharan
Assistant Professor
Computer Science

Bootstrap Learning for Incorporating Human Feedback in Agent Domains
Human input can help an intelligent agent learn a rich representation of the task and application domain. However, the lack of time or necessary expertise may prevent the human participants from providing elaborate and accurate feedback of the agent's performance. This paper/poster describes a probabilistic bootstrap learning approach for enabling an intelligent agent to effectively merge limited high-level human feedback with the information acquired by interacting with the environment. The performance of the proposed approach is illustrated in two simulated game domains.

Layered Object Models for Autonomous Learning and Recognition on Mobile Robots
This paper/poster describes a probabilistic approach that enables a mobile robot to characterize (previously unseen) objects in dynamic real-world domains using adaptive layered graphical models. The layered object model consists of local, global and temporal visual cues and probabilistic correlations between the cues. The robot is able to autonomously acquire such models for novel objects introduced in its domain and to recognize and track such objects in subsequent images.

To Look or Not to Look: A Hierarchical Representation for Visual Planning on Mobile Robots
This paper presents a hierarchical planning strategy that enables a mobile robot to tailor visual sensing and information processing to the task and domain at hand. The hierarchy incorporates constrained convolutional policies, automatic belief propagation and bootstrap learning to enable reliable and efficient human-robot interaction in dynamic real-world domains.

Dr. Brian Still
Associate Professor, Technical Communication
English

EyeGuide
EyeGuide is an effective, affordable eye tracking system. Innovated at Texas Tech and now a commercially licensed product, it is a hardware/software technology solution that enables usability researchers, as well as those working in marketing, human factors, advertising and design, to understand what users see as they interact with a wide range of digital products such as websites, software and product packaging.

Dr. Mark Stoll
Director of Environmental Studies
History

'Sagacious' Bernard Palissey: Marsh, Pinchot, and the Connecticut Origins of Conservation
Argues the origins of the U.S. environmental movement began in Connecticut.

Dr. Victoria Sutton
Paul Whitfield Horn Professor, Director, Center for Biodefense, Law and Public Policy
Law

Toxicological Animal Studies: Disparate Treatment as Scientific Evidence
This article examines the jurisdictionally disparate treatment of toxicological animal studies as evidence and the courts' reasoning for the exclusion or limitation of the toxicological animal studies, explore the potential misunderstandings of the science of toxicology and offer suggestions for more consistently applying the Daubert principles for the admission of scientific evidence to toxicological animal studies.

Dr. Andy Swift
Professor
Wind Science & Engineering Research Center

Gear with Asymmetric Teeth for Use in Wind Turbines
There is a concern on the reliability of wind turbines, directed to the fact that gearbox failure has been a major problem in the wind industry. The objective of this research was to design and construct a test bed for testing the performance of asymmetric gears. The tests to be performed on the test bed include gear dynamics, tip relief modification, high-contact-ratio and wear.

Ms. Brenda Swinford
Assistant Librarian
Libraries

Meeting the Changing Needs of Today’s University Students with a Technology-enhanced Collaborative Learning Area
This poster, presented at the Texas Library Association Annual Conference, highlights the new GroupWorks group study area recently launched at Texas Tech University Libraries. The area facilitates collaboration between students within the library and between blended groups that might also include students and/or faculty from across campus, off-campus, or even in another part of the world. Resources include conference-style media tables with built-in, large-screen monitors and individual laptop connections, videoconferencing equipment, giant rolling touch-screen monitors that offer interactive white board capabilities, and more.

Ms. Carrye Syma
Associate Librarian
Libraries

IMPS: Innovations, Mobility and Personalized Service
Innovations, mobility and personalized services (IMPS) have significantly changed the way we do business in libraries. From the era of "library as place" and librarian "behind the desk," students and faculty have moved to accessing library resources anytime, anywhere. Librarians are incorporating IMPS into websites and pedagogy, but they are presented with a balancing act between technologically adept students and their oftentimes less technologically proficient professors.

Dr. Carolyn Tate
Professor of Art History
Art

The Axolotl as Food and Symbol in the Basin of Mexico, from 1200 BC to Today
This chapter appears in the book Pre-Columbian Foodways: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Food, Culture, and Markets in Ancient Mesoamerica. The axolotl is a salamander that regenerates. People made images of it as symbols for the embryonic state in 1200 BC. Today it is used in scientific research.

Dr. William Tydeman
Professor
Libraries

Llano Estacado
An explanation of different ways of seeing and understanding the High-Staked Plain of Texas and New Mexico.

Dr. Fernando Valle
Assistant Professor
Education

Alternative Teacher Certification Program and Diversity in the Schools
Dual tensions in the classroom provide the impetus for this research—one for highly qualified teachers who promote all students’ success, including those from diverse backgrounds; the other—for teachers who are in short supply, particularly in science, math, special education and bilingual education. The alternative certification programs (ACP) route of credentialing educators is now mainstream and, therefore not “alternative”; however, it is difficult to discern the effectiveness of the AC Programs or the individuals who have completed them.

Dr. Mark Webb
Associate Professor of Philosophy
Philosophy

Diversity, Hizmet and Hoşgörü: the Philosophical Foundations of the Gülen Movement
This paper is an exploration of how the signature values of the movement inspired by Fethullah Gülen, a Turkish Sufi, can be grounded in secular philosophical reasoning. Both the value of hizmet (service) and the value of hoşgörü (respect) are underwritten by general and secular philosophical reasons. This has the consequence that the Gülen movement is a good model for people of all religions, or even no religion, who want to improve society.

Dr. Brandon Weeks
Associate Professor
Chemical Engineering

Nanoscale Investigation of Surfaces Exposed to a Thermite Spray
A thermite spray gun was developed to examine the reaction's potential to penetrate a metal surface. This mini-torch was shown to be highly effective for micron particle fuel and oxidizer mixtures but nano-particles are not as effective for generating reactions that enable penetration through a substrate.

Mr. Robert G. Weiner
Associate Humanities Librarian
Libraries

The Adventures of James Bond Jr., Sequential Art, and a 12-Issue Marvel Comics Series
This book chapter discusses the history of James Bond Jr. and in particular analyzes the 12 issue series that Marvel Comics produced during the early 1990s.

Cinema Inferno: Celluloid Explosions from the Cultural Margins
Cinema Inferno: Celluloid Explosions from the Cultural Margins addresses significant areas (and eras) of "transgressive" filmmaking, including many subgenres and styles that have not yet received much critical attention. This collection of essays covers both contemporary films and those produced in the last 50 years to provide a theoretical framework for looking at transgressive cinema and what that means. This volume contains a number of essays that examine the aesthetic of "realism" and '70s Italian horror and thrillers, including essays on critically underrepresented directors Lucio Fulci and Sergio Martino.

From the Arthouse to the Grindhouse: Highbrow and Lowbrow Transgression in Cinema's First Century
While there are numerous books on art and exploitation cinema, very few attempt to examine both. Covering the first 100 years of cinematic transgressions, this volume is a collection of numerous essays representing key contributions to overlooked, forgotten or under-analyzed parts of film history from cult favorites like Arch Hall Jr. to revered but under-documented marquee names like Lon Chaney. The volume documents the bleeding edge of the high/low cultural divide. Other essays examine the films of directors Tod Browning, Pier Pasolini and Peter Watkins.

Holocaust Documentaries
This article looks at the past 60 years of Holocaust-related documentaries. The authors discuss a number of related factors surrounding documentaries including purpose, categories, content, theme and memory.

In the Peanut Gallery with Mystery Science Theater 3000: Essays on Film, Fandom, Technology and the Culture of Riffing
These essays represent the first full-length scholarly analysis of the award-winning television series Mystery Science Theater 3000. The series featured a human host and a pair of robotic puppets who, while being subjected to some of the worst films ever made, provided ongoing hilarious and insightful commentary in a style popularly known as “riffing.” The show has been described as “the smartest, funniest show in America,” and forever changed the way we watch movies.

James Bond Audiography
Academic librarians serve a diverse community and use a variety of reference sources to answer their community's questions. Many questions are answered by reference sources that are not found in traditional formats like books and are now commonly found in electronic sources. As such they sometimes "fall" through the cracks. For instance, little has been written or documented relating to James Bond talking books. We hope to rectify this problem with the following "audiography" of Bond-related audio books. Despite the fact that cassette technology is now obsolete and CD is not far behind, this "audiography" lists items published to date (2009) on cassette, CD, MP3, wma file and audio download. Bond fans and scholars will find this audiography a useful addition to the documentation of James Bond in its various formats.

James Bond in World and Popular Culture
Provides the most comprehensive study of the James Bond phenomena ever published. Forty original essays provide new insights, scholarship and understanding to the world of James Bond. Topics include the Bond girl, Bond related video games, Ian Fleming's relationship with the notorious Aleister Crowley and CIA director Alan Dulles, and much more. Scholars from a wide variety of disciplines have contributed a unique collection of perspectives on the world of James Bond and its history.

Marvel Comics and the Golem Legend
The Jewish legend of the golem is often considered the prototype as the "original" superhero (influencing the creation of Superman and other characters). During the 1970s Marvel Comics used the golem legend to create their own unique brand of "monster" superhero. This essay describes the various ways Marvel has used the golem motif in its sequential art stories. First appearing in the pages of Strange Tales, this golem differed from the original stories of Rabbi Loew's supernatural savior. The character really did not resonate with the comic book-buying public, lasting only three issues and one guest appearance. Yet the concept of the golem was too powerful a metaphor to be discarded. Marvel Comics brought back another type of golem for their Invaders World War II series. The creators (specifically writer Roy Thomas) tried to answer the question, what if a golem had been there to protect Jews during the Holocaust? This golem was a man/clay hybrid who was also a Rabbi.

The Perfect Threat: Arch Hall Jr., The Sadist and the Ideal Teenager
This article looks at the film career of actor Arch Hall Jr. Some of the films we discuss include Eegah, The Choppers and Wild Guitar. In particular we look the transgressive film The Sadist (1963). The film was the first "fictional" telling of the Charlie Starkwether story. Starkwether was one of the first "road" serial killers doing his dirty deeds in the late 1950s. We argue that there is a "new" kind of serial killer folklore found in films like The Sadist.

The Prince of Exploitation: Dwain Esper
This chapter looks at the life and career of filmmaker Dwain Esper. Esper made movies during the 1930s that pushed the boundaries of cinematic taste. His films Narcotic, Modern Motherhood, and Marihuana toured carnivals and the road show circuit even playing in small towns. Esper was adept at getting his films shown anywhere often without the approval of the production code. Esper's 1934 film Maniac remains a milestone in exploitation/transgressive cinema. Maniac is analyzed and discussed in detail. It is film without much narrative continuity, and one which is poorly made. Despite this, I argue that viewed today, the film has the same aesthetic quality as some "art films.”

A Selected Annotated Guide to Grateful Dead Fiction and Prose in Print and Compact Disc
This piece is a guide to Grateful Dead related fiction, short stories, novels, prose in print and compact disc. Included is the bibliographic information. There are six basic categories that Grateful Dead fiction falls into all of which are documented in this chapter. These are: road stories with the Grateful Dead, The Grateful Dead as part of the narrative, show stories-concert happenings, Deadhead characters, retelling of the Grateful Dead folk tale and Grateful Dead lyrics are used to tell the story.

Sequential Art Narrative and the Holocaust
This article reviews Holocaust portrayals in sequential art narratives dating back to the 1940s up to the present day. Works like Art Spiegelman's Maus and graphic novel adaptations of Anne Frank's biography are discussed.

The Storyteller Speaks: Rare and Different Fictions of the Grateful Dead
The Storyteller Speaks: Rare & Different Fictions of the Grateful Dead is a collection of literary short stories inspired by the Grateful Dead. Authors include Robert Hunter, Ed McClanahan, Vincent Louis Carella, Stephan Graham Jones, Mitch Myers, C. Clayton Chandler, Heather Jackson, Philip Baruth, Tom Gonzales, Eddie Cain and many others. The volume also features a guide to previously published Grateful Dead related fiction.

Theatre of the Absurd: The 1966 Batman Movie
This article argues that the 1966 Batman movie remains a milestone in comic book feature films. From 1951-1979 there were only three major comic book related movies. Batman: The Movie was released in August 1966. It was the movie to see that summer. Batmania was in full swing with merchandising tie-ins such as toys, books and comics. The movie had a clever script, pacing, gadgets and one of the coolest cars ever committed to celluloid. People today still associate Adam West with the Batman some 45 years after he first donned the cape.

Ms. B. Lynn Whitfield
Associate Archivist
Libraries

James Bond in World and Popular Culture
Provides the most comprehensive study of the James Bond phenomena ever published. Forty original essays provide new insights, scholarship and understanding to the world of James Bond. Topics include the Bond girl, Bond related video games, Ian Fleming's relationship with the notorious Aleister Crowley and CIA director Alan Dulles, and much more. Scholars from a wide variety of disciplines have contributed a unique collection of perspectives on the world of James Bond and its history.

Dr. Bruce Whittlesey
Associate Professor
Chemistry

Asymmetric Aziridination of N-tert-butanesulfinyl Imines with Phenyldiazomethane via Sulfur Ylides
Optically active aziridines were synthesized from the reaction of chiral nonracemic N-tert-butanesulfinyl imines with benzyl-stabilized sulfur ylides, wherein the latter were generated from a rhodium-catalyzed decomposition of phenyldiazomethane (PDM) in the presence of various sulfides. In most cases, the aziridines were formed and isolated in quantitative yield and the 2,3-trans-aziridines were found to predominate over the 2,3-cis-aziridine isomers. The diastereoselectivity between the two trans-aziridines was found to vary significantly, depending upon the solvent and sulfide employed in the reaction.

Dr. Simon Williams
Associate Professor
TTUHSC Cell Biology and Biochemistry

Human Transcriptome Analysis Reveals a Potential Role for Active Transport in the Metabolism of Pseudomonas Aeruginosa Autoinducers
The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa employs acyl homoserine lactones (AHL) as signaling compounds to regulate virulence gene expression via quorum sensing. The AHL N-3-oxo-dodecanoyl-lhomoserine lactone (3OC12-HSL) also induces mammalian cell responses, including apoptosis and immune modulation. In certain cell types, the apoptotic effects of 3OC12-HSL are mediated via a calcium-dependent signaling pathway, while some pro-inflammatory effects involve intracellular transcriptional regulators. However, the mechanisms by which mammalian cells perceive and respond to 3OC12-HSL are still not completely understood. Here, we used microarray analysis to investigate the transcriptional response of human lung epithelial cells after exposure to 3OC12-HSL.

Microbial Signaling Compounds as Endocrine Effectors
The major focus of this book is how chemical signals, including classic hormones, produced by the mammalian endocrine system alter the behavior of microbes residing in the host. However, it is also apparent that residential and transient microbes also produce signals within a host and that these signals are incorporated into the chemical milieu shared by mammalian and microbial cells. Therefore this chapter will explore the possibility that microbe-derived chemicals can transmit signals to host cells and alter host-cell behavior. We will define the properties expected of a cross-kingdom signal, citing specific examples from the plethora of metabolites, toxins, second messengers and other small chemicals produced by microbes. Furthermore, we will describe published evidence of the potential physiological effects of microbial signals on host cells. In keeping with the classic model of endocrine signaling, we will also discuss potential microbial signal-mammalian receptor interactions.

Dr. Christopher Witmore
Associate Professor of Classical Archaeology
Classical & Modern Languages & Literatures

Archaeology and the Second Empiricism
This essay responds to a challenge posed by the editors of the volume, Archaeologies into the 2010s, in which it will appear in 2012. The challenge centers on whether the on-going renegotiation of key features and concerns at the heart of Archaeology, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History is connected with a revitalization of empiricism, and whether it is possible to speculate as to which "turn" these past-oriented disciplines will take, more broadly in the coming decade. From here the editors push matters further with the question: ". . . if we are resurrecting empiricism, what is the difference between Empiricism 2.0 and the familiar Empiricism 1.0 that has shaped the humanities during modernity?" This essay is a response to that question. More specifically the essay lays out several propositions as to the shape and character of what might be called the "second empiricism."

Dr. Aliza Wong
Associate Chair
History

Protecting the Palate: Racial Discourse and Xenophobia in Italian Food Culture
This paper, given at the Echi Oltre Mare Conference in Rome, Italy, discusses how ideas of nationalism influence the preparation and contents of Italian food.

Dr. Hua-Wei Zhou
Joe Pevehouse Endowed Chair, Professor of Seismology
Geosciences

2D Deformable-layer Tomostatics with the Joint Use of First Breaks and Shallow Reflections
We have developed a deformable-layer tomography method with the joint use of first breaks and shallow reflections (Joint DLT) to calculate static corrections. The method is tested with a synthetic model and a field dataset from Tarim Basin, Western China. The synthetic test shows that our joint DLT method can provide velocity interface geometries with high resolution. The field test result indicates that the method can yield a geologically reasonable near-surface velocity model and an improved stack section in comparison with the sections from the DLT (using only first breaks) as well as two other kinds of commercial tomostatics software.

Crustal and Upper-mantle Seismic Reflectors Beneath the Three Gorges Reservoir Region
Seismic studies of the crustal structure beneath the Three Gorges Reservoir (TGR) region in Central China have been limited by the sparse and uneven distribution of seismic stations. To increase the station coverage, we made three deployments of a mobile seismologic array in the TGR region during the three summers from 2008 to 2010. Here we present interpretations along a west-east profile through the central TGR region based on new seismic waveform data and a velocity model constrained by regional earthquake data. Two strong mid-crustal reflection interfaces at depths around 10 and 20 km are seen under the TGR. The shallow reflector defines the bottom of the Zigui (秭归) basin. The new waveform data show that the amplitude of the Moho reflection is quite weak, and beneath the Moho, there is a strong reflector around 54-km depth. It is likely that in the TGR region, the Moho is a gradient rather than a sharp boundary. We speculate that the gradient Moho and the 54-km-deep reflector in the upper mantle in the TGR region may be by-products of the Qinling (秦岭)- Dabie (大别) orogen.

On the Layering Artifacts in Seismic Imageries
A common feature in seismic imageries of the crust and mantle is a layering pattern. Layering structures do exist in multiple scales, such as layered strata and unconformities in local and regional scales, and undulating seismic discontinuities in the crust and mantle. However, layering artifact also exists due to limitations in seismic processing and data coverage. There is a tendency for seismic stacking methods to over-map reflectors and scatters into along-isochron layers. In contrast, seismic tomography methods tend to under-map sub-horizontal layers with along-raypath smears and artifacts of various de-mean processes. To better identify signals and artifacts in seismic imageries, it is necessary to understand the origins of various artifacts and make careful comparison between the solutions of different data and methods.

Tomographic Velocity Model Building of the Near Surface with Velocity-inversion Interfaces: A Test Using the Yilmaz Model
First-arrival travel time tomography is a popular approach to building the near-surface velocity models for oil and gas exploration, mining, geo-engineering, and environmental studies. However, the presence of velocityinversion interfaces (VIIs), across which the overlying velocity is higher than the underlying velocity, might corrupt the tomographic solutions. This is because most first-arrival ray paths will not traverse along any VII, such as the top of a low-velocity zone. We have examined the impact of VIIs on first-arrival tomographic velocity model building of the near surface using a synthetic near-surface velocity model. This examination confirms the severe impact of VIIs on first-arrival tomography. When the source-to-receiver offset is greater than the lateral extent of the VIIs, good near-surface velocity models can still be established using a multiscale deformable-layer tomography (DLT), which uses a layer-based model parameterization and a multiscale scheme as regularization. Compared with the results from a commercial grid-based tomography, the DLT delivers much better near-surface statics solutions and less error in the images of deep reflectors.

Traveltime Inversion and Error Analysis for Layered Anisotropy
While tilted transverse isotropy (TTI) is a good approximation of the velocity structure for many dipping and fractured strata, it is still challenging to estimate anisotropic depth models even when the tilted angle is known. With the assumption of weak anisotropy, we present a TTI traveltime inversion approach for models consisting of several thickness-varying layers where the anisotropic parameters are constant for each layer. For each model layer the inversion variables consist of the anisotropic parameters ε and δ, the tilted angle φ of its symmetry axis, layer velocity along the symmetry axis, and thickness variation of the layer. Using this method and synthetic data, we evaluate the effects of errors in some of the model parameters on the inverted values of the other parameters in crosswell and Vertical Seismic Profile (VSP) acquisition geometry. The analyses show that the errors in the layer symmetry axes sensitively affect the inverted values of other parameters, especially δ. However, the impact of errors in δ on the inversion of other parameters is much less than the impact on δ from the errors in other parameters. Hence, a practical strategy is first to invert for the most errortolerant parameter layer velocity, then progressively invert for ε in crosswell geometry or δ in VSP geometry.

Dr. Yu Zhuang
Associate Professor
Computer Science

Higher-accuracy Schemes for Approximating the Hessian from Electronic Structure Calculations in Chemical Dynamics Simulations
In this paper, we present a family of generally applicable schemes for updating the Hessian from electronic structure calculations based on an equation derived with compact finite difference (CFD). The CFD-based equation is of higher accuracy than the quasi-Newton equation on which existing generally applicable Hessian update schemes are based. Direct tests of Hessian update schemes, as well as dynamics simulations using an integrator incorporating Hessian update schemes, have shown four of the new schemes produce reliably higher accuracy than existing Hessian update schemes.




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