University Library FACE 2006 2006 Entries- Visual and Performing Arts

22nd Annual Faculty Academic Contributions Virtual Exhibit

 

The following items, arranged by the author's last name, were part of the 2006 exhibit:

"Cracking the Shakespeare Code: a Review of 'Will in the World'" by Stephen Greenblatt, Shakespeare Review Greenblatt

Aaron Adair, Assistant Professor in Theatre

Bio: Dr. Aaron Adair, Assistant Professor in Theatre, is an actor, educator, and scholar whose career in the arts and education have helped foster a wide range of interests, among them acting styles, musical theatre, and Shakespearean studies. Dr. Adair received his Ph.D. in Humanities from The University of Texas at Dallas. He is the Founder and Moderator of Bardolatry, a Special Interest Group (SIG) in American Mensa, Ltd. and is a guest editor of the "Mensa Research Journal. "

Abstact: This book review of Stephen Greeblatt's "Will in the World " examines the author 's sleuth-like construction of the events that may have influenced the life and works of William Shakespeare. Included are documents and accounts that relate both directly and indirectly to Shakespeare 's life that support Greenblatt 's theories as to how the genius of Shakespeare came manifest itself in his works. The review touches upon Greenblatt 's methodology and lists a few examples that make this text both provacative and insightful amongst the canon of Shakespearean history and criticism.

"Bob's Book" (Artist Book with Linocuts)

Future Akins-Tillett, Assistant Professor in Visual Studies

Bio: For the first 17 years of my life I was raised in a military family; traveling around the world, living in isolated parts of the United States and always restless for a sense of "home." Lubbock has grown to become my safe place to fall. My degrees are from Tech, my education from life, as such my work resides somewhere between the world of formally defined art and the world of traditional crafts.

Abstact: Artist book with linocuts and hand-embellished cover. Limited edition.

"A Skeleton Get Well"

Dirk Fowler, Assistant Professor in Art

Abstact: English professor John Poch and I collaborated on a project in which our graduate poetry students wrote poems and his undergraduate design students made broadside posters of these poems. Professor Fowler decided to make a print of one of my poems. It is a one of a kind print.

"Coyotebanjo: Traditional Irish Music from America"

Angela Mariani, Visiting Assistant Professor in Music History and Literature

Bio: A native of the state of Massachusetts, Angela Mariani holds the Bachelor of Music degree from the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, and the Master's Degree in Early Music from the Early Music Institute at Indiana University's School of Music, with a specialization in medieval music and early vocal performance. She is the recipient of a Certificate in Medieval Studies from IU's Medieval Studies Institute and the Joseph Garton Memorial Scholarship for early music performance, and has completed the coursework for the Early Music Institute's Operation of Early Music Programs doctoral degree.

Abstract: Many of the greatest recordings in Irish traditional music were made in remarkably off-the-cuff fashion: great players playing live for a few hours without overdubs. Like jazz, this music thrives on the spark of players reacting to each other. The concept with Coyotebanjo was to capture those earlier discs vibe while exploiting the pristine recording standards of today. "Short Jacket and White Trousers ", sung by School of Music faculty member Angela Mariani and arranged by Chris Smith, was the 2006 winner of the Global Rhythm/Sonic Bids Song Contest; it will be featured on their annual compact disc, reaching over 120,000 readers.

"Coyotebanjo: Traditional Irish Music from America"

Christopher J. Smith, Assistant Professor in Music History

Bio: Christopher J. Smith is Associate Professor in Musicology/Ethnomusicology and directs the Vernacular Music Center at TTU. His research interests are in American, African-American, 20th Century, and Irish traditional musics, improvisation, and performance practice. He is the author of numerous books and essay and has presented papers and master-classes around the world. He tours internationally with Altramar medieval ensemble, leads the Irish band Last Night 's Fun, and has performed at hundreds of colloquia, concerts, and pub sessions. He is also a published poet.

Abstract: Many of the greatest recordings in Irish traditional music were made in remarkably off-the-cuff fashion: great players playing live for a few hours without overdubs. Like jazz, this music thrives on the spark of players reacting to each other. The concept with Coyotebanjo was to capture those earlier discs vibe while exploiting the pristine recording standards of today. "Short Jacket and White Trousers ", sung by School of Music faculty member Angela Mariani and arranged by Chris Smith, was the 2006 winner of the Global Rhythm/Sonic Bids Song Contest; it will be featured on their annual compact disc, reaching over 120,000 readers.

"'¡Toco Violín!' Journey to Honduras: An Essay"

Bruce Wood, Associate Professor in Music Education

Bio: Bruce Wood is an Associate Professor of Music Education at Texas Tech University. Dr. Wood received his Masters and Ph.D. from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and his Bachelor's degree from Morningside College in Sioux City, Iowa. In addition, he holds certification in public school administration. Dr. Wood has been the orchestra director and string education professor at St. Cloud State University in Minnesota for the past eleven years, the last five of which he served as Chair of the Department of Music. During that time, the department enrolled and graduated more string education majors than any other university in the State of Minnesota. Dr Wood has extensive conducting experience, including ten years of public school instruction. During his tenure at Owatonna, MN schools, the American String Teacher's Association named the district Most Outstanding Program in Minnesota. Dr. Wood was the founding Music Director of the Westerville Ohio Symphony, and has conducted youth orchestras in Minnesota and Wisconsin, and conducted workshops, festivals, and clinics throughout the Midwest.

Abstact: This is the ethnographic account of a professor who, along with another professor and three graduate students from Texas Tech University, traveled to work with string teachers and students in the capital city of Tegucigalpa, Honduras for twelve days in May of 2005. Issues of musicianship, culture, poverty, and the power of the creative human spirit are explored through a story of teaching string lessons and conducting orchestras. Accepted for publication in Strings Magazine, the article will appear in their August/September issue.