University Library FACE 2006 2006 Entries- Human Sciences

22nd Annual Faculty Academic Contributions Virtual Exhibit

 

The following items, arranged by the author's last name, were part of the 2006 exhibit:

"The American Mosque: Design, Use and Symbolism"

Cherif Amor, Associate Professor, Department of Design

Bio: Cherif M. Amor joined the faculty at Texas Tech University in 2000. He earned a Ph.D. in Environmental Design with a specialization in the semantics of the built environment, from the University of Missouri Columbia (2000). Early graduate work (M. Phil degree in architecture, 1987) with special emphasis on home environments was completed at the School of Architecture, New Castle Upon-Tyne England. Recent research interests focuses on American Muslims built environment and its correlation with the social, cultural, and economic contexts. Concomitantly, as a computer literate, with an inclination toward behavioral sciences, another current research interest involves the impact of computer technology on pedagogic environments. During the last five years, he has been the recipient and nominee of eight research and teaching awards as well as the recipient of three research grants.

Abstact: While it is very well documented that Islam was in practice in the United States before the American Civil War, there is a lack of studies pertaining to American Muslim physical environments, specifically the mosque environment from an environmental behavioral perspective. The scarce literature that started to emerge decades after the 1963 ratification of the immigration laws revolved around the art and architectural contexts (built environment) while the behavioral studies remained almost negligible. Various authors have addressed profusely the art and architectural contexts of the mosque while the behavioral and semantic contexts remained unexplored. Hence, the purpose of this research is: (a) to identify the meanings associated with the resulting spatial composition as pertaining to the social, psychological, and cultural contexts, and (c) to identify the spatial consequences of adaptation to the host environment.
     Because of the heterogeneity of the American mosque, thirteen mosques were selected from three states—Michigan, Illinois and Texas—that included existing and custom built structures, sizes, and locations. Two data collection techniques were used: 1) open-ended interviews, and 2) physical surveys that holistically provided cross data validity checks. During the open-ended interview sessions, whereby an interview guide was used, thirteen community leaders, imams, or members of the boards of trustees were interviewed in the mosque in spaces of their choice. Data were analyzed using open coding.
     Data analysis, specifically the process of categorizing phenomena, whereby a taxonomy was used, resulted in several themes: a) importance of the socio-cultural and psychological dimensions, b) semiotic intricacies, c) symbolism of the built environment, and d) synchronism and diachronism of the mosque. These themes were allowed to emerge and took the central stage of the present exploration.

"Case Studies in Financial Counseling"

Dorothy Bagwell, Assistant Professor in Personal Financial Planning

Bio: Dorothy C. Bagwell, Ph.D., AFC is Assistant Professor of Personal Financial Planning in the College of Human Sciences. Bagwell also directs the operations of Red to Black™, a peer-to-peer financial education program for Texas Tech students. She earned her Doctorate in Resource Management, with a specialization in Family Financial Management from Virginia Tech. She holds a Bachelor’s Degree from Louisiana State University and a Master of Science in Family Studies from Texas Woman's University.

Abstact: Case Studies in Financial Counseling is an instructional DVD designed to facilitate problem-based learning on how to work with couples and individuals who are struggling with the emotional and financial aspects of their lives. Developed in summer 2005, the goal of this collaborative project was to develop media appropriate to present to financial counseling/planning and other mental health professionals true-to-life counseling vignettes to assist in teaching and continuing education training. The vignettes are designed to stimulate student and instructor discussion and a facilitator s guide accompanies the DVD for reference by educators and practitioners to reinforce the content of the vignettes.

"The Renovation of a 1974 Contemporary Home"

Don Collier, Associate Professor in Interior Design

Bio: Associate Professor of Interior Design in my 4 year at TTU. Prior experience, 27 years of professional experience as a Design Director for major architectural/interior design firms in Dallas, Texas. Graduate of Texas Tech in 1975 with an MFA. Professional Design Training at Parsons School of Design, New York, New York. Registared Interior Designer with the State of Texas. [Off web: Don Collier joined the faculty at Texas Tech University in 2002. Don comes to Texas Tech University after 25 years of professional practice in the Design industry. His professional experience includes serving as Design Director for four major nationally known Architectural firms. While serving as Design Director, Mr. Collier was honored by both the Texas Society of Architects and The American Institute of Architects for outstanding work in historical restoration projects and corporate headquarters. Most recently, he served as President of his own company which represented Commercial Furniture Manufacturers to the Architecture and Interior Design community in Texas, Oklahoma, Arkansas, and Louisiana. Mr. Collier is an alumni of Texas Tech University with a Masters of Fine Arts degree in Design. For the last two years, he has been teaching part time at the Dallas Art Institute where his major emphasis was in the area of Commercial and Hospitality Design.

Abstact: The Renovation of a 1974 COntemporary Home Client: 2 Professors w/3 children Problem: Home built in 1974 had never been renovated or touched, purchased in 1974 origional condition. Inspiration: Researched cutting edge designers of the 1974 period and took cues for a solution along with program needs of the client. Solution: Using the best of 1974 & making it appropriate for today w/2006 colors & furnishings.

"Case Studies in Financial Counseling"

Stephen Harris, Associate Professor

Bio: Steven M. Harris, Ph.D., LMFT, is Associate Professor of Marriage and Family Therapy and Associate Dean for Academic Programs in the College of Human Sciences.  Dr. Harris holds a Bachelor’s degree in Family Science from Brigham Young University, and a Master’s and a Doctoral Degree in Marriage and Family Therapy from Syracuse University.  He is the author of multiple peer-reviewed articles and book chapters on the ethical practice of psychotherapy, family violence, and the professional development and identity of mental health practitioners. 

Abstact: Case Studies in Financial Counseling is an instructional DVD designed to facilitate problem-based learning on how to work with couples and individuals who are struggling with the emotional and financial aspects of their lives. Developed in summer 2005, the goal of this collaborative project was to develop media appropriate to present to financial counseling/planning and other mental health professionals true-to-life counseling vignettes to assist in teaching and continuing education training. The vignettes are designed to stimulate student and instructor discussion and a facilitator s guide accompanies the DVD for reference by educators and practitioners to reinforce the content of the vignettes.

"Mathematically Gifted Male Adolescents Activate a Unique Brain Network During Mental Rotation"

Michael O 'Boyle, Professor in Human Development and Family Studies

Bio: Professor O Boyle is nationally and internationally recognized for his research on the brain-based origins and mechanisms of mathematical giftedness, and is the former Director of the Morgan Centre for the Study of High Intellectual Potential at the University of Melbourne, Australia. A faculty member in the Department of Human Development and Family Studies at Texas Tech University since 2004, he brings a wealth of research and neuroimaging experience to the investigation of the neural correlates of mathematical ability.

Abstact: Mental rotation involves the creation and manipulation of internal images, with the later being particularly useful cognitive capacities when applied to high-level mathematical thinking and reasoning. Many neuroimaging studies have demonstrated mental rotation to be mediated primarily by the parietal lobes, particularly on the right side. In this study we use fMRI to show for the first time, that when performing 3-D mental rotations, mathematically gifted male adolescents engage a qualitatively different brain network than those of average math ability, one that involves bilateral activation of the parietal lobes and frontal cortex, along with heightened activation of the anterior cingulate. Reliance on the processing characteristics of this uniquely bilateral system and the interplay of these anterior/posterior regions may be significant contributors to their mathematical precocity.

"Differences in Self-report Measures by Adolescent Sex Offender Risk Groups," International Journal of Offender Therapy and Comparative Criminology, 49: 82-106.

Alan Reifman, Associate Professor in Human Development and Family Studies

Bio: Alan Reifman is an Associate Professor in the Department of Human Development and Family Studies. He studies adolescent and young-adult substance use, social networks, and parent-child relations.

Abstact: Differences in characteristics among three groups of juvenile sex offenders were examined. Risk was defined as the sum of the following variables: type of offense (violent or not), and presence/absence of prior histories of a sex offense, family or own sexual or substance abuse, behavior problems, and unstable home life. Low-risk (0-2 risk factors), medium-risk (3), and high-risk (4-6) offender groups were formed. The high-risk group reported less family cohesion, more aggression, lower self-esteem, more social discomfort, and more frequent and extreme sexual fantasies. Implications of these findings for identification of and interventions with adolescent sex offenders are discussed.

"Differences in Self-report Measures by Adolescent Sex Offender Risk Groups," International Journal of Offender Therapy and Comparative Criminology, 49: 82-106.

Richard Wampler, Professor in Marriage and Family Therapy

Bio: Richard Wampler is a Professor in the Marriage and Family Therapy program within the Department of Applied & Professional Studies. He studies high-risk children and adolescents, and their families.

Abstact: Differences in characteristics among three groups of juvenile sex offenders were examined. Risk was defined as the sum of the following variables: type of offense (violent or not), and presence/absence of prior histories of a sex offense, family or own sexual or substance abuse, behavior problems, and unstable home life. Low-risk (0-2 risk factors), medium-risk (3), and high-risk (4-6) offender groups were formed. The high-risk group reported less family cohesion, more aggression, lower self-esteem, more social discomfort, and more frequent and extreme sexual fantasies. Implications of these findings for identification of and interventions with adolescent sex offenders are discussed.