University Library FACE 2006 2006 Entries- Education

22nd Annual Faculty Academic Contributions Virtual Exhibit

 

The following items, arranged by the author's last name, were part of the 2006 exhibit:

"John Dewey and the Art of Teaching: Toward Reflective and Imaginative Practice"

Judy Aycock, Assistant Academic Dean Education

Abstact:

"School Officials and the Courts: Update 2005," by Thompson, D.P., Hartmeister, F. and Mead, J.F.

Fred Hartmeister, Professor in Education and Law

Bio: Fred Hartmeister teaches in the Educational Leadership program and serves as Department Chair for Educational Psychology & Leadership in the College of Education. His primary research interests emphasize K-12 legal issues encountered by public educators and attorneys representing school districts.

Abstact: School Officials and the Courts: Update 2005 is the 26th in a series of monographs published by Educational Research Services (ERS). The monograph summarizes judicial opinions focusing on elementary and secondary education issues. The case summaries are useful to school administrators, board members, students of education law, and others concerned with recent legal developments.

"Self-Esteem and Empathy in Sighted and Visually Impaired Preadolescents," Journal of Visual Impairment and Blindness, vol. 99 no. 5, May 2005: 276-285

Nora Griffin-Shirley, Associate Professor in Educational Psychology and Leadership

Bio: Nora Griffin-Shirley is an Assistant Professor for the College of Education, Department of Educational Psychology and Leadership, and Program Coordinator for Special Education/Virginia Sowell Center.  Dr. Griffin-Shirley received her Ph.D. from Georgia State University.  Dr. Griffin-Shirley’s teaching specialties are blindness related coursework, special education, human resource development and gerontology.

Abstact: The article reports on a study of self-esteem and empathy among 71 students with visual impairments and 88 sighted students. No significant difference was found between the two groups of students in their levels of self-esteem, empathy toward others, and bonding with pets.

"Feminism and Feminist Therapy: Lessons from the Past and Hopes for the Future," Journal of Counseling and Development, vol. 83 no. 3, Summer 2005: 269-277

Aretha Marbley, Associate Professor in Educational Psychology and Leadership

Bio: Aretha Marbley is Associate Professor and Director of Community Counseling in Counselor Education at Texas Tech University and Regional Six Director and President for the National Association for Multicultural Education. Her research centers on multiculturalism, diversity, and social justice in mental health and education.  In the last nine years, she has over 60 International, National, Regional, and State and 40 local presentations; 30 publications; and served on over 30 committees focused on diversity, social justice, and equity.  She has also provided ongoing service in the form of professional development workshops on diversity issues for many corporate, political, community, school, clergy-based agencies and organizations.  

Abstact: Feminist therapy incorporates the psychology of women (e.g., J. B. Miller, 1976), development research (e.g., C. Gilligan, 1982), cognitive-behavioral techniques (J. Worell & R. Remer, 1992), multicultural awareness (L. Comas-Dia & B. Greene, 1994), and social activism (L. S. Brown, 1994) in a coherent theoretical and therapeutic package. it is an orientation that is effective in various venues and with diverse populations. In the article, the authors trace the relevant historical aspects of the orientation along with implications for practice, critiques, and trends.

"Responding to Prisoner Reentry, Recidivism, and Incarceration of Inmates of Color: A Call to the Communities," Journal of Black Studies, vol. 35 no. 5, May 2005:  633-649

Aretha Marbley, Associate Professor in Educational Psychology and Leadership

Abstact: The article introduces a systematic model for rehabilitation that used the expungement procedure, a preexisting statute, as a tool to reduce incarceration and recidivism and help probationers succeed in their reentry into mainstream society as taxpaying citizens and concomitantly alleviate the burden on taxpayers for maintaining prisoners. It culminates with a call t the African American and Hispanic communities to partner with penal system and lawmakers to find solutions to the devastating effects of increasingly high imprisonment, recidivism, and prison reentry rates of inmates of color on children, families, and communities.

"Development and Evaluation of the Mathematics Interest Inventory"

Arturo Olivarez, Jr., Associate Professor in Educational Psychology and Leadership

Bio: Dr. Arturo Olivarez, Jr., is an Associate Professor in the College of Education, Division of Educational Psychology and Leadership, at Texas Tech University.  Dr. Olivarez received his Ph.D. in Educational Psychology with a specialization in Research, Measurement and Statistics, from Texas A&M University.  He received his M.S. in Mathematics Education specializing in Mathematics Instruction and B.S. in Mathematics with a minor in Business Administration from the University of Texas – Pan American.  Dr. Olivarez is a member of the American Educational Research Association, the Southwest Educational Research Association, the National Council on Educational Measurement and the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics.  Current interests include: performance assessment of curriculum, mathematics education, applied statistics, research methodology and latent partition methodology.

Abstact: The study describes the development of the Mathematics Interest Inventory. Internal reliability and concurrent and construct validity were evaluated using 3 samples of children totaling 724. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses revealed the presence of 3 factors representing the psychological state of individual interest. Cross-validation with older children supported the factors. Published in Measurement and Evaluation in Counseling and Development. Co-authored with Tara Stevens (submitted separately)

"John Dewey and the Art of Teaching: Toward Reflective and Imaginative Practice"

Douglas J. Simpson, Professor in Curriculum and Instruction

Bio: Douglas J. Simpson is Professor and Helen DeVitt Jones Chair in Teacher Education, Texas Tech University, where he coordinates the M. Ed. and Ph.D. Programs in Curriculum and Instruction. He edits the Journal of Thought and is the author or co-author of numerous articles, chapters and books, including John Dewey and the Art of Teaching, The Pedagodfathers, John Dewey Primer, Recreating Schools, and Educational Reform. He has held tenured positions at the University of Louisville, University of Newfoundland, Tennessee State University, and Texas Christian University.

Abstact: John Dewey and the Art of Teaching translates Dewey's theories of teaching, learning, curriculum, and democracy into readable and practical language. The book extends and challenges thinking about the science and art of teaching through examining the larger contexts in which it occurs and by exploring the many roles of teachers as change agents. In addition, the book encourages policymakers and educational leaders to help create teachers who are free to think and create as they educate each student in and for democratic communities.

"Development and Evaluation of the Mathematics Interest Inventory," Measurement and Evaluation in Counseling and Development, vol. 38 no. 3, October 2005: 141-152

Tara Stevens, Assistant Professor in Educational Psychology and Leadership

Bio: Tara Stevens is an Assistant Professor in Educational Psychology at Texas Tech University.  Dr. Stevens received her Ed.D.  in Educational Psychology from Texas Tech University; her M.S. in General Psychology and B.A. in Psychology from Angelo State University.  Dr .Stevens received the Texas Tech Alumni Association New Faculty Award, College of Education, for 2004, and was the recipient of the Outstanding Doctoral Student Award for 2000.  Dr. Stevens is a member of the American Psychological Association and the American Educational Research Association.

Abstact: The study describes the development of the Mathematics Interest Inventory. Internal reliability and concurrent and construct validity were evaluated using 3 samples of children totaling 724. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses revealed the presence of 3 factors representing the psychological state of individual interest. Cross-validation with older children supported the factors. Published in Measurement and Evaluation in Counseling and Development Co-authored with Arturo Olivarez, Jr.