University Library FACE 2006 2006 Entries- Arts and Sciences

22nd Annual Faculty Academic Contributions Virtual Exhibit

 

The following items, arranged by the author's last name, were part of the 2006 exhibit:  Anderson-Holtz, Iber-Neugebauer, and Olaniran-Warner

 

"Protecting the environment and People's well-being in the Nigerian Ogoni land," Olaniran, B. A. & Williams, D. E.  M. Parkinson and D. Ekachai (Eds.), International and Intercultural Public Relations: A campaign case approach, Boston: Allyn & Bacon (2005): 320-332.

Bolanle Olaniran, Professor in Communication Studies

Bio: Bolanle Olaniran (Ph. D. University of Oklahoma, 1991)is a Professor in the Department of Communication Studies. Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas. His research includes Crisis Communication, Organization Communication, and Communication Technologies.

Abstact: The chapter presents the case of the Nigerian Ogoni People and the multinational oil companies. The ensuing crises emanating from environmental protection and people 's well being was identified. Implications for crisis management and recommendations were offerd in the chapter from the communication perspective. Discussion questions were offered for students to gain their perspectives regarding the issues in the case study and how the crisis was managed.

"Preparing for terrorism: A Rationale for the crisis Communication Center."  H. O 'Hair., R. Heath., & G. Ledlow (Eds.), Community Preparedness and Response to Terrorism, 2005

Bolanle Olaniran, Professor in Communication Studies

Abstact: The chapter explores the possible risks that potential terrorist attacks, the like of the 9/11, provide for citizens and communities across the United States to develop crisis communication Center (CCC). The goal of the crisis communication center is to have a central information source for citizens in their plan to avert crisis and manage crisis alltogether. The nature of information to be provided by the center will include terrorist risk, threat, and attack. The chapter also draws from the "anticipation model of crisis management " in building our argument.

"Going Afield," Museum of Texas Tech University

Carleton Phillips, Professor in Biological Sciences

Bio: Carleton Phillips was born in Muskegon, Michigan. He received his BS from Michigan State University and his MA and PhD from the University of Kansas. He came to Texas Tech University in 1998 and has served as department chair and as Assistant Vice President for Research. Most recently he served as a William C. Foster Fellow in the Office of Proliferation Threat Reduction at the United States Department of State and as Special Advisor on Nonproliferation to the CPA in Baghdad, Iraq (2003-2004). His research interests include mammalian biology and biosecurity.

Abstact: Going Afield is a collection of biographical sketches by senior field biologists who have conducted extensive research on mammals. The book was edited by Carleton Phillips and Clyde Jones and also includes their biographical chapters and a history of the science of field mammalogy in North America. Going Afield is the only book of its type, in which authors trace their childhood and educational experience and link this into their successes as scientists.

"A Skeleton Get Well"

John Poch, Associate Professor in English

Bio: John Poch is Associate Professor in English at Texas Tech. His first book, POEMS, is published by Orchises Press (2004). He is the editor of 32 Poems Magazine. His work has appeared in many journals, and in 2004, he was a Howard Nemerov Fellow at the Sewanee Writers' Conference.

Abstact: TTU Art Professor Dirk Fowler and I collaborated on a project in which our graduate poetry students wrote poems and his undergraduate design students made broadside posters of these poems. Professor Fowler decided to make a print of one of my poems. It is a one of a kind print.

"Interstate Rivalry and the Recurrence of Crises: A Comparison of Rival and Nonrival Crisis Behavior, 1918-1994"

Brandon Prins, Assistant Professor in Political Science

Bio: Brandon C. Prins, b. 1971, PhD in Political Science (Michigan State University, 1999); Assistant Professor, Texas Tech University (2003- ). Professor Prins has recently published articles in Journal of Conflict Resolution, Journal of Peace Research, International Studies Quarterly, International Interactions, Presidential Studies Quarterly, and Congress and the Presidency. His current research interests include U.S. and comparative foreign policy, inter-state conflict, and congressional-executive relations.

Abstact: Research on enduring rivalry has received considerable theoretical and empirical attention in the last few years. As scholars begin to relax assumptions regarding event independence and historical memory, rivalry has emerged to explain dependencies across countries and over time. Despite the evidence to date, some scholars challenge the rivalry distinction and suggest a stochastic model may explain the distribution of militarized disputes equally as well. However, if the pairings of states that define the list of enduring rivals are fundamentally different than other pairs of states, differences in behavior should be evident in crisis situations. For rival states in crisis, conflict patterns should vary systematically across conflicts. The likelihood of military action should be lower in dispute one compared to dispute six or eight or twelve. Second, the conflict strategies of rival states in crisis should differ from the conflict strategies of non-rival states in crisis.

"Advisor-Advisee Communication Two: The Influence of Verbal Aggression and Humor Assessment on Advisee Perceptions of Advisor Credibility and Affective Learning," Communication Research Reports, Vol. 22, No. 4, December 2005: 303-313

Narissra Punyanunt-Carter, Assistant Professor in Communication Studies

Bio: Narissra Maria Punyanunt-Carter (Ph.D., Kent State University, 2002) is an assistant professor in the department of communication at Texas Tech University. She is a prot g of Dr. Rebecca Rubin, who is considered one of the most prolific and notable researchers in interpersonal communication. Dr. Punyanunt-Carter 's research interests include romantic relationships, computer-mediated communication, father-daughter communication, instructional communication, and religious communication.

Abstact: The purpose of the current study was to examine the relationships among ethnocentrism, intercultural communication apprehension, religious fundamentalism, homonegativity, and tolerance for religious disagreements. This study found a positive relationship between religious fundamentalism with ethnocentrism and homonegativity. The study further found a negative relationship between tolerance for religious disagreement with ethnocentrism and religious fundamentalism. Lastly, homonegativity, ethnocentrism, and tolerance for religious disagreement were shown to account for approximately 17.5% of the variance in an individual s intercultural communication apprehension. However, religious fundamentalism was not shown to be related to intercultural communication apprehension.

"Evaluating the Effects of Attachment Styles on Relationship Maintenance Behaviors in Father-Daughter Relationships"

Narissra Punyanunt-Carter, Assistant Professor in Communication Studies

Abstact: The objective of this study is to evaluate the effects of attachment styles on relationship maintenance behaviors in father-daughter relationships. Two hundred and seven father-daughter dyads participated in the study. Results indicate that both daughters’ and fathers’ attachment styles do not affect their relationship maintenance behaviors. Results also demonstrate that fathers are more likely than daughters to use all the relationship maintenance behaviors except for social networks. Moreover, fathers are more likely to use shared tasks and advice relationship maintenance behaviors than are their daughters.

"Father and Daughter Motives and Satisfaction," Communication Research Reports, Vol. 22, No. 4, December 2005: 293-301

Narissra Punyanunt-Carter, Assistant Professor in Communication Studies

Abstact: The objective of this study was to investigate the motives that fathers and daughters use to communicate with each other and how this impacts their perceptions of satisfaction with each other. Two hundred and seven father-daughter dyads participated in the study. Results indicated that daughters communicated mainly with their fathers for the following motives: affection, relaxation, pleasure, and inclusion. Fathers reported communicating with their daughters for pleasure, affection, and relaxation. Results also showed that daughters who communicated with their fathers as a means of relaxation were more satisfied with their relationship and communication. Fathers who communicated with their daughters for pleasure were more satisfied with their relationship and communication. Findings indicate a means of increasing satisfaction among father-daughter relationships by encouraging communication that incorporates statements of affection and pleasure. [on web abstract: There are few studies in the communication discipline dealing with father–daughter relationships and methods for increasing satisfaction within these relationships. This study investigates the motives fathers and daughters have when communicating with each other and how these motives affect relationship satisfaction. Results indicated that daughters communicated mainly with their fathers for the following motives: affection, relaxation, pleasure, and inclusion. Fathers reported communicating with their daughters for pleasure, affection, and relaxation. Findings indicate a means of increasing satisfaction among father–daughter relationships by encouraging communication that incorporates statements of affection and pleasure.]

"Enhanced Translational Diffusion of Rubrene in Sucrose Benzoate"

Edward L. Quitevis, Professor in Chemistry and Biochemistry and Joint Professor in Physics

Bio: Edward L. Quitevis was born April 2, 1952, in San Francisco, California. He received the B.S. degree in Chemistry with Highest Honors from the University of California at Berkeley in March 1974 and was elected to Phi Beta Kappa in 1974. He received the Ph.D. degree in Chemical Physics in 1981 from Harvard University. After postdoctoral work at the University of Toronto, he joined the faculty at Texas Tech University in September 1984.

Abstact: The translational diffusion of rubrene in the fragile molecular glass-former, sucrose benzoate (SB), has been studied by using the technique of holographic flourescence recovery after photobleaching. The temperature dependence of the translation diffusion constant DT is weaker than that of T/η for T < 1.2Tg but tracks 1/τD for 1.05Tg < T < 1.21Tg (Tg = 337 K), where η is the viscosity and τD is the dielectric relaxation time of SB. The value of DT at Tg is enhanced by a factor of 2.5 x 10¬2 over the value predicted by the Stokes-Einstein equation and is characterized by a scaling law, DT ~ η- ξ, with ξ = 0.729.

"United States Patent #6,862,971 for Ballistic Protection Composite Shield and Method of Manufacturing"

Seshadri Ramkumar, Assistant Professor in Environmental Toxicology, Institute for Environmental and Human Health

Bio: Dr. Ramkumar received his PhD from University of Leeds, England. He has been with TTU since 1999.

Abstact: The work reports a new invention on the development of leather based anti-ballistic bullet proof vests. This work contributes to our national defense and homeland security

"Perchlorate occurrence in the Texas southern high plains aquifer system"

Moira Ridley, Associate Professor in Geosciences

Bio: Moira Ridley is an Associate Professor in the Geosciences Department at Texas Tech University. She received her PhD from the University of Nebraska. Her teaching and research is in the area of Aqueous and Environmental Geochemistry, where the focus is on understanding the chemical reactions between natural aqueous solutions and geologic materials present in the earth’s crust.

Abstact: In the spring of 2002, the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality determined that perchlorate (ClO4-) was present in the ground water from the McMillan and Paul Davis well fields that supply potable water for the city of Midland. Researchers began a large-scale sampling program to determine the source(s) and distribution of perchlorate in the area’s ground water. This document summarizes the findings of a large-scale investigation in nine counties carried out from July to December 2002. This program included public water systems (PWS) wells and private wells in Andrews, Borden, Dawson, Ector, Gaines, Glasscock, Howard, Martin, and Midland counties, which occupy a total area of 23,960 km2. Water samples were tested for perchlorate and a suite of common ions. From a total of 254 wells sampled in nine counties, 179 wells (70%) had detectable perchlorate concentrations (>0.5 ppb) and 88 wells (35%) had perchlorate concentrations equal to or above 4 ppb. The highest perchlorate concentration found at a private well was 58.8 ppb in Dawson County, while the highest concentration detected for a well in PWS was 45.6 ppb in city of Midland, Midland County. Perchlorate positively correlated (α < 0.0001) with Cl-, F-, Br-, SO42-, Mg2+, and K+ but not with NO2-, NO3-, NA+, or Ca+. Research to date has identified the most likely sources to be (1) a natural mineralogical impurity; (2) agricultural fertilizers containing perchlorate; (3) in situ generation of perchlorate by electrochemical reactions; or (4) some combination of the three. This study suggests that there may be significant sources other than the traditional industrial processing of perchlorate, and the distribution of perchlorate in ground water is likely more widespread than previously suspected.

"Perchlorate and Iodide in Dairy and Breast Milk," Environmental Science & Technology 39 (2005) 2011-2017

Ernest E. Smith, Associate Professor in Environmental Toxicology

Abstact: Perchlorate inhibits iodide uptake and may impair thyroid and neurodevelopment in infants. Recently, we unambiguously identified the presence of perchlorate in all seven brands of dairy milk randomly purchased from grocery stores in Lubbock, TX. How widespread is perchlorate in milk? Perchlorate in 47 dairy milk samples from 11 states and in 36 human milk samples from 18 states were measured. Iodide was also measured in a number of the samples. Perchlorate was detectable in 81 of 82 samples. The dairy and breast milk means were, respectively, 2.0 and 10.5 μg/L with the corresponding maximum values of 11 and 92 μg/L. Perchlorate is present in virtually all milk samples, the average concentration in breast milk is five times higher than in dairy milk. Although the number of available measurements are few at this point, for breast milk samples with a perchlorate content greater than 10 μg/L, the iodide content is linearly correlated with the inverse of the perchlorate concentration with a r2 of >0.9 (n = 6). The presence of perchlorate in the milk lowers the iodide content and may impair thyroid development in infants. On the basis of limited available data, iodide levels in breast milk may be significantly lower than it was two decades ago. Recommended iodine intake by pregnant and lactating women may need to be revised upward.

2nd Most-Accessed Article, Jan.-June 2005, Environmental Science & Technology

"Perchlorate Accumulation in Forage and Edible Vegetation"

Philip N. Smith, Assistant Professor in Environmental Toxicology

Bio: Dr. Phil Smith is originally from Paducah, Kentucky where he graduated from Saint Mary High School.  Dr. Smith’s undergraduate degree in chemistry and biology was completed at Murray State University in 1989.  After working in the chemical and pharmaceutical industries for three years, Phil began his graduate work at Clemson University’s Institute of Wildlife and Environmental Toxicology.  He then transferred with his major advisor, Dr. Scott McMurry, to Texas Tech University in 1997.  His dissertation research was done near his home in western Kentucky at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant where he examined rodent and raccoon exposure and responses to polychlorinated biphenyls and metals.  He received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Environmental Toxicology from Texas Tech in 2000. 
     Dr. Smith then joined The Institute of Environmental & Human Health (TIEHH) at Texas Tech as a Research Assistant Professor.  In 2002, Dr. Smith was appointed Assistant Professor, and now serves as a member of the Terrestrial Toxicology Division.  Dr. Smith is an ecotoxicologist whose research interests center on ecological and physiological characteristics of organisms, populations, and environments that contribute to contaminant exposure and adverse effects.
     Since joining TIEHH as a faculty member, Dr. Smith has worked on numerous projects dealing with the ecological effects of ammonium perchlorate contamination in the environment.  His research examines exposure and pathways of contaminant exposure among mammals, birds, and a variety of aquatic organisms, trophic-level transfer of environmental contaminants, and physiological and population-level responses to contaminant exposure.  Dr. Smith serves as field and technical project coordinator for TIEHH’s SERDP research.

Abstact: The accumulation of perchlorate in vegetation is becoming a concern, with increasing numbers of sites reporting the presence of perchlorate in ground water and surface water. This study investigated potential perchlorate uptake and distribution by a variety of forage and edible crops in both the laboratory and field. Perchlorate concentrations in soybean leaves grown in the green house were significantly higher than perchlorate concentrations in soybean seeds and pods. Perchlorate concentrations in alfalfa grown in sand were significantly lower than those in alfalfa grown in soil. The concentration of perchlorate in tomatoes was lower in the fruit than the leaves. Commercially grown wheat and alfalfa samples all contained perchlorate, 0.72 – 8.6 mg/kg of fresh weight (FW) in the wheat stems, 0.71 – 4.4mg/kg of FW in the wheat heads, and 2.9 mg/kg of FW in alfalfa. All field garden samples tested (including cantaloupe, cucumber, and tomato) that were irrigated with perchlorate – tainted water contained perchlorate at various concentrations ranging from 0.040 to 1.65 mg/kg of FW. Bioconcentration factors (BCF), ratios of plant fresh weight concentrations to estimated or measured concentrations {(9ug/L of FW)/ug/L}, were all in the same order of magnitude ranging from 215+- 126 for wheat stems to 233 +- 264 for wheat heads and to 380 +- 89 for alfalfa. BCF for garden fruit samples were much lower (0.5 -20). Results from this study highlight the potential for perchlorate exposure by routes other than drinking water.

"Thyroid function and reproductive success in rodents exposed to perchlorate via food and water"

Philip N. Smith, Assistant Professor in Environmental Toxicology

Abstact: The purpose of the present study was to determine if exposure to perchlorate via food items would have effects on mammals similar to those caused by exposure through drinking water at approximately equivalent doses. Prairie voles (Microtus ochrogaster) and deer mice (Peromyscus maniculantus) were used to assess the potential toxicity of perchlorate –contaminated food items. Voles and mice were divided randomly into three treatment groups – perchlorate contaminated food (PCF), perchlorate contaminated water (PCW), and control groups – such that each treatment group, contained equal numbers of males and females.
     Rodents in PCF treatment group were fed chow formulated with soybean plant matter that had been grown with perchlorate –contaminated irrigation water. Individuals in the control and PCF groups were provided distilled/deionized drinking water, whereas the PVW group received drinking water containing sodium perchlorate. Only slight differences among treatment groups were observed in a variety of end points, including reproductive success, tissue, perchlorate concentrations, thyroid hormone concentration and thyroid histology.
     However, trends observed in the present study suggest that perchlorate exposure via water may result in slightly greater effects than exposure to perchlorate via food. These data and recent reports of perchlorate in a wide variety of food items indicate that exposure via food intake is an important consideration when examining cumulative risk among humans, livestock and wildlife.

"Concentration of Area in Half-Planes," Proceedings of the American Mathematical Society, Vol. 133 No. 7: 2091-2099

Alexander Yu Solynin, Associate Professor in Mathematics

Bio: Alexander Solynin received his Diplom (with honors) in Mathematics in 1980 from the Kuban State University, Krasnodar, Russia and his Ph.D. in 1985 from the Institute of Applied Mathematics & Mechanics, Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Donetsk. From 1983 to 1989, he was an assistant professor of mathematics and from 1989 to 1990, an associate professor at the Kuban State University in Krasnodar, Russia. In 1990, Dr. Solynin joined the Steklov Institute of Mathematics at St. Petersburg, Russia, where he was a senior research fellow from 1993 to 2004. He came to Texas Tech University in Fall 2004 as an associate professor.
     Dr. Solynin's research interests include complex analysis, potential theory, and qualitative theory of PDE's. In particular, he enjoys working on extremal problems in geometric function theory and mathematical physics. Problems with highly symmetric conjectured extremal configurations are of a special interest. In his 60 publications, Dr. Solynin developed new approaches to symmetrization, quadratic differentials, variational and parametric methods and applied them to solve several extremal problems raised by prominent mathematicians.

Abstact: For the standard class S of normalized univalent functions f analytic in the unit disk U, we consider a problem on the minimal area of the image f(U) concentrated in any given half-plane. This question is related to a well-known problem posed by A. W. Goodman in 1949 that regards minimizing area covered by analytic univalent functions under certain geometric constraints. An interesting aspect of this problem is the unexpected behavior of the candidates for extremal functions constructed via geometric considerations.

"Overdetermined Boundary Value Problems, Quadrature Domains and Applications," Computational Methods and Function Theory, 5 No. 1 (2005): 19-48

Alexander Yu Solynin, Associate Professor in Mathematics

Abstact: We discuss an overdetermined problem in planar multiply connected domains Ω. This problem is solvable in Ω if and only if  is a quadrature domain carrying a solid-contour quadrature identity for analytic functions. At the same time the existence of such quadrature identity is equivalent to the solvability of a special boundary value problem for analytic functions. We give a complete solution of the problem in some special cases and discuss some applications concerning the shape of electrified droplets and small air bubbles in a fluid flow.

"The Poincaré Metric and Isoperimetric Inequalties for Hyperbolic Polygons," Transactions of the American Mathematical Society, Vol. 357 No. 10: 3905-3932>/p>

Alexander Yu Solynin, Associate Professor in Mathematics

Abstact: We prove several isoperimetric inequalities for the conformal radius (or equivalently for the Poincaré density) of polygons on the hyberbolic plane. Our results include, as limit cases, the isoperimetric inequality for the conformal radius of Euclidean n-gons conjectured by G. Pólya and G. Szegö in 1951 and a similar inequality for the hyberbolic n-gons of the maximal hyperbolic area conjectured by J. Hersch. Both conjectures have been proved in previous papers by the third author.

Our approach uses the method based on a special triangulation of polygons and weighted inequalities for the reduced modules of trilaterals developed by A. Yu. Solynin. We also employ the dissymmetrization transformation of V. N. Dubinin. As an important part of our proofs, we obtain monotonicity and convexity results for special combinations of the Euler gamma functions, which appear to have significant interest in their own right.

"Sharp Estimates for Hyberbolic Metrics and Covering Theorems of Landau Type," Annales Academiæ Scientiarum Fennicae, Mathematica, Vol. 30, 2005: 113-133

Alexander Yu Solynin, Associate Professor in Mathematics

Abstact: One of the main covering results asserts that if a holomorphic function f in the unit disk satisfies |f’(0)| ≥ A| f (0)| with A . 4, then f covers an annulus of the form r < |w| < Kr for some r > 0, where K is a certain function of A. Extremals are furnished by universal covering maps onto complements of certain discrete sets. The covering theorems are proved by solving minimum problems for hyberbolic metrics.

"Exploding the Western: Myths of Empire on the Postmodern Frontier"

Sara Spurgeon, Assistant Professor in English

Bio: Sara Spurgeon is Assistant Professor of Literatures of the American Southwest in the Department of English at Texas Tech University.  She works in the areas of Western/Southwestern American Literatures, feminist and postcolonial theory, and nature/environmental writing.  She is the co-author of Writing the Southwest, has published and lectured on Cormac McCarthy and Ana Castillo, and serves on the editorial and advisory boards of the journal Western American Literature, the Western Literature Association, and the Western Writers Series. Exploding the Western: Myths of Empire on the Postmodern Frontier (2005) is her second book.   

Abstact: Myths of the frontier are so quintessentially part of American culture that the literature of the West is in some senses the least regional and most national of all.  The frontier--the place where cultures meet and rewrite themselves upon each others' texts--continues to energize writers whose fiction evokes, destroys, and rebuilds those myths.  Exploding the Western: Myths of Empire on the Postmodern Frontier considers how differing versions of frontier myths are being recast by contemporary writers in a globalized world and interrogates ways in which they challenge and accommodate increasingly fluid and dangerous racial, cultural, and international borders.

"To Love the Wind and the Rain:" African Americans and Environmental History"

Mark Stoll, Associate Professor in History

Abstact: Frustrated by a sense that African American perceptions of the environment have been ignored for the most part, scholars Dianne D. Glave and Mark Stoll have put together a book that begins to correct this vast oversight. To Love the Wind and the Rain: African Americans and Environmental History is a groundbreaking and vivid analysis of the relationship between one race and its surroundings. The essays in To Love the Wind and the Rain focus on three major themes in connection to African Americans: the rural environment; the urban and suburban environments; and the notion of environmental justice. Meticulous in their research, the contributors cover such subjects as slavery, hunting, gardening, religion, women, and politics. Stoll contributed one of the volume's essays, “Religion and African American Environmental Activism.” In the foreword, Carolyn Merchant says, “The stories of the African Americans in this volume must be read in the context of the enormity of this oppressive history and the struggles of individuals and communities to overcome its consequences.” According to Merchant, the essays “not only show us how to write a new kind of African American environmental history, but illustrate the ways that writing history can itself become a moral act.”

"Australia, New Zealand, and the Pacific: An Environmental History"

Mark Stoll, Associate Professor in History

Bio: Mark Stoll researches the influence of religion on ideas about nature. A graduate of the University of Texas at Austin, he has published Protestantism, Capitalism, and Nature in America (1997) and numerous articles and chapters. With Dianne Glave he coedited To Love the Wind and the Rain : African Americans and Environmental History (2005). Stoll edits the book series Nature and Human Societies for ABC-Clio, the first four volumes of which appeared in 2005.

Abstact: The interdisciplinary Nature and Human Societies series, edited by Mark Stoll, meets growing international interest in world environmental history. Each volume focuses on a geographical region. More than a history of the environment, the series examines how environmental factors shaped human affairs. Four volumes appeared in 2005: The Mediterranean: An Environmental History, by J. Donald Hughes; Northeast and Midwest United States: An Environmental History, John T. Cumbler; Australia, New Zealand, and the Pacific: An Environmental History by Don Garden; and Northern Europe An Environmental History, by Tamara L. Whited, Jens I. Engels, Richard C. Hoffmann, Hilde Ibsen, and Wybren Verstegen.

"The Mediterranean: An Environmental History"

Mark Stoll, Associate Professor in History

Abstact: The interdisciplinary Nature and Human Societies series, edited by Mark Stoll, meets growing international interest in world environmental history. Each volume focuses on a geographical region. More than a history of the environment, the series examines how environmental factors shaped human affairs. Four volumes appeared in 2005: The Mediterranean: An Environmental History, by J. Donald Hughes; Northeast and Midwest United States: An Environmental History, John T. Cumbler; Australia, New Zealand, and the Pacific: An Environmental History by Don Garden; and Northern Europe An Environmental History, by Tamara L. Whited, Jens I. Engels, Richard C. Hoffmann, Hilde Ibsen, and Wybren Verstegen.

"Northeast and Midwest: An Environmental History"

Mark Stoll, Associate Professor in History

Abstact: The interdisciplinary Nature and Human Societies series, edited by Mark Stoll, meets growing international interest in world environmental history. Each volume focuses on a geographical region. More than a history of the environment, the series examines how environmental factors shaped human affairs. Four volumes appeared in 2005: The Mediterranean: An Environmental History, by J. Donald Hughes; Northeast and Midwest United States: An Environmental History, John T. Cumbler; Australia, New Zealand, and the Pacific: An Environmental History by Don Garden; and Northern Europe An Environmental History, by Tamara L. Whited, Jens I. Engels, Richard C. Hoffmann, Hilde Ibsen, and Wybren Verstegen.

"Northern Europe: An Environmental History"

Mark Stoll, Associate Professor in History

Abstact: The interdisciplinary Nature and Human Societies series, edited by Mark Stoll, meets growing international interest in world environmental history. Each volume focuses on a geographical region. More than a history of the environment, the series examines how environmental factors shaped human affairs. Four volumes appeared in 2005: The Mediterranean: An Environmental History, by J. Donald Hughes; Northeast and Midwest United States: An Environmental History, John T. Cumbler; Australia, New Zealand, and the Pacific: An Environmental History by Don Garden; and Northern Europe An Environmental History, by Tamara L. Whited, Jens I. Engels, Richard C. Hoffmann, Hilde Ibsen, and Wybren Verstegen.

"Voices from Vietnam: Eye-witness Accounts of the War, 1954-1975"

Richard Burks Verrone, Assistant Archivist, Vietnam Archive

Bio: Dr. Richard B. Verrone holds a doctorate in American, Asian, and European History from Texas Tech University, has been a Fulbright Scholar to Vietnam, and is an Adjunct Professor of History in the TTU Department of History. He has been an Instructor in the TTU Honors College and the TTU Osher Lifelong Institute, and is currently President of the TTU Staff Senate.

Abstact: Between 1965 and 1973 the Vietnam War claimed over 58,000 American lives, many thousands more Allied troops from Australia, New Zealand, and South Korea, as well as hundreds of thousands of troops and civilians in North and South Vietnam, Laos, Cambodia, and Thailand. Collected here are the first-hand stories of men and women who witnessed and participated in the Vietnam War. From operations on the ground in Southeast Asia to the domestic upheaval in America, these compelling accounts bring the reader to the forefront of America 's longest war.