2004 Faculty Academic Contributions Exhibit 2004 Virtual Exhibit 2004 Entries-research

2004 Annual Faculty Academic Contributions Exhibit- Research and Discoveries

  The following items were part of the 2004 exhibit.  Items not donated are the personal property of Texas Tech University faculty and are not owned by the Texas Tech University Libraries.

Tabloid map entitledSan Saba: Royal Fort - Apache Mission

Grant D. Hall, Associate Professor of Anthropology

Texas Tech College of Arts & Sciences

Abstract: This tabloid was designed for the Presidio de San Saba Restoration Corporation, and is intended to allow visitors to Menard, Texas, to lead themselves on a self-guided tour of the eighteenth century Spanish colonial fort and mission founded by soldiers and priests in the area. It provides step-by-step instructions on getting to the fort and mission and outlines the history and archaeological findings relevant to each location.

"Human Ability and Spatial Intelligibility: Sketch Mapping, Wayfinding and Environmental Cognition"

Researcher and Author: Saif Haq; Assistant Professor & Coordinator, LPMD Program

Texas Tech College of Architecture

Abstract: Sketch mapping is an important experimental method in environmental cognition research, but their analysis has always been difficult. The inclusion of Space Syntax methods provides a new dimension. A comparison with other tools of sketch map analysis is an important focus of this paper. An experiment was conducted in two complex hospital buildings where ninety-six volunteers completely unfamiliar with the two environments explored the setting and completed various cognitive tasks including sketch mapping. The environments were analyzed through Space Syntax methods and additional theoretically-derived techniques. These were compared with cognitive outputs and the results indicated that intelligibility of settings is an important measure that is predictive of wayfinding and environmental cognition. However, geometric and metric relations cannot be ignored, and there may be certain instances when those factors may become overwhelming.

  

Display entitled "What is a Playa?"

David Haukos; Range, Wildlife, and Fisheries Management

Texas Tech College of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources

Abstract: This is a multidisciplinary project among the College of Education; Department of Range, Wildlife, and Fisheries Management, Lubbock Lake Landmark; and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The display is on permanent exhibit at the Lubbock Inernational Airport. The project originated as a result of the curiosity of air travelers flying into Lubbock over the numerous circular depressions that dot the Southern High Plains surrounding the city. This curiosity increases when these depressions are filled with water following a thunderstorm. These depressions are playa wetlands -- a feature unlike anywhere else in the world. We developed an informational and aesthetic educational display explaining the existence, uniqueness, importance, and value of playas. The goal of the display is to increase the understanding and appreciation of playa wetlands within the Southern High Plains and across the nation.
This item can be viewed in the basement of the library.

Patent application entitled "Quantum Switches and Circuits"

Kenneth Ketner, Paul Whitfield Horn Professor and Charles Sanders Peirce Interdisciplinary Professor

Texas Tech Institute for Studies in Pragmaticism

Abstract: Quantum switches, referred to as trisistors, operate on the basis of interactions between two elementary particles (EP), such as photons, electrons, phonons, etc. A first EP is used as a control input to the trisistor and interacts with a second EP, thereby inducing a detectable state change in the second EP that determines the trisistor's output value. The physical property which determines the particular EP state could be, for example, polarization, spin direction or energy level. The operation of the various embodiments of the invention is based on a triadic theory of particle behavior that the inventors have proposed in which all interactions between elementary particles can be defined as a function of a history of each particle's quantum states both before and after the interaction between the two particles. The trisistor's can be combined to form various types of logic gates, circuits and other computer circuits. To implement the trisistors, one preferred embodiment employs a thin section of nonlinear crystal, such as beta barium borate. Photons form a laser, for example, are incident as on the crystal as input and interact with electrons therein, thereby changing their states and resulting in the emission of other photons as output.
To view the entire patent application online at the United States Patent and Trademark Web site, click here. 

  

Map entitled "Map of the Llano Estacado"

Kevin Mulligan, Associate Professor of Geography

Texas Tech College of Arts & Sciences

Abstract: This map portrays West Texas and Eastern New Mexico as a unique geographic region based upon the topograpy of the Llano Estacado. The Llano Estacado is a relatively flat tableland located on the Southern High Plains. The region is unique in so far as the landscape is characterized by thousands of ephemeral playa lakes and few streams.
This map is located in Government Documents at the entrance to the south staircase.

Weblog entitled "Perl's Architecture Weblog"

Robert Perl, Associate Professor of Architecture

Texas Tech College of Architecture

Abstract:  A frequently updated, chronological website of abstracts and links to interesting pictures and articles about current issues in architectue and the built environment. Fall Semester 2003: Perl's Architecture Weblog, 351 articles, 596 links, 108 pages; over 3000 visits.
To view the weblog online, click here.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Architecture research entitled "Declining Curtis"

Brian T. Rex, Assistant Professor of Architecture

Texas Tech College of Architecture

Abstract: Curtis is a small town (pop. 750) on the high plains of Nebraska. It is less than 25 miles from Kansas and less than 80 miles from Colorado. In 1925 it had a railroad station and 1,500 citizens. In 1983 the railroad stopped all service along the trunk line that runs through the town. Curtis is remote. Curtis is in decline. How do you design "in decline"? The project encompasses four years of urban and architectural study of what is becoming of small towns on the High Plains. The work began as an urban documentation and straight-forward design of street-scaping for the community. This was completed through a pair of service learning classes or community design workshops. The streetscaping proposal was presented to the community as a set of guidelines, plans and templates for action. The comprehensive material and the discoveries that came out of these workshop classes was reconsidered later in a speculative design proposal that retraced the conditions of the urban fabric and reexamined the desires of the community in an open way that faces the rising prospects of the small-town in decline. Over a gradual and long-term design process we opened up our inquiry about this sort of place to the fact that the town is in decline, that it's population would shrink. We explored this situation by speculating on a set of tactics for designing for decline.

  

Display entitled "What is a Playa?"

Sue Shore, Education Program Manager for Lubbock Lake Landmark

Texas Tech Lubbock Lake Landmark

Abstract: This is a multidisciplinary project among the College of Education; Department of Range, Wildlife, and Fisheries Management, Lubbock Lake Landmark; and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The display is on permanent exhibit at the Lubbock Inernational Airport. The project originated as a result of the curiosity of air travelers flying into Lubbock over the numerous circular depressions that dot the Southern High Plains surrounding the city. This curiosity increases when these depressions are filled with water following a thunderstorm. These depressions are playa wetlands -- a feature unlike anywhere else in the world. We developed an informational and aesthetic educational display explaining the existence, uniqueness, importance, and value of playas. The goal of the display is to increase the understanding and appreciation of playa wetlands within the Southern High Plains and across the nation.
This item can be viewed in the basement of the library.

  

Display entitled "What is a Playa?"

Loren Smith, Professor of Range, Wildlife, and Fisheries Management

Texas Tech College of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources

Abstract: This is a multidisciplinary project among the College of Education; Department of Range, Wildlife, and Fisheries Management, Lubbock Lake Landmark; and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The display is on permanent exhibit at the Lubbock Inernational Airport. The project originated as a result of the curiosity of air travelers flying into Lubbock over the numerous circular depressions that dot the Southern High Plains surrounding the city. This curiosity increases when these depressions are filled with water following a thunderstorm. These depressions are playa wetlands -- a feature unlike anywhere else in the world. We developed an informational and aesthetic educational display explaining the existence, uniqueness, importance, and value of playas. The goal of the display is to increase the understanding and appreciation of playa wetlands within the Southern High Plains and across the nation.
This item can be viewed in the basement of the library.

  

Display entitled "What is a Playa?"

Julie Thomas, Associate Professor of Education

Texas Tech College of Education

Abstract: This is a multidisciplinary project among the College of Education; Department of Range, Wildlife, and Fisheries Management, Lubbock Lake Landmark; and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The display is on permanent exhibit at the Lubbock Inernational Airport. The project originated as a result of the curiosity of air travelers flying into Lubbock over the numerous circular depressions that dot the Southern High Plains surrounding the city. This curiosity increases when these depressions are filled with water following a thunderstorm. These depressions are playa wetlands -- a feature unlike anywhere else in the world. We developed an informational and aesthetic educational display explaining the existence, uniqueness, importance, and value of playas. The goal of the display is to increase the understanding and appreciation of playa wetlands within the Southern High Plains and across the nation.
This item can be viewed in the basement of the library.