2004 Faculty Academic Contributions Exhibit 2004 Virtual Exhibit 2004 Entries- books

20th Annual Faculty Academic Contributions Exhibit

  The following books were part of the 2004 exhibit:
Metaphor and Knowledge: The Challenges of Writing Science

Ken Baake, Assistant Professor of English

Texas Tech College of Arts & Sciences

Abstract: Metaphor and Knowledge offers a sweeping history of rhetoric and metaphor in science, delving into questions about how language constitutes knowledge. Weaving together insights from a group of scientists at the Santa Fe Institute as they shape the new interdisciplinary field of complexity science, Ken Baake shows the difficulty of writing science when word meanings are unsettled, and he analyzes the power of metaphor in science.

The African Texans

Alwyn Barr, Professor of History

Texas Tech College of Arts & Sciences

Abstract: African Americans living in Texas since the sixteenth century have seen their lives change in significant ways. This volume seeks to expand an awareness of their contributions, especially to culture and society over that lengthy period of time. This volume is a summary and synthesis of research by the author and a wide range of other scholars in new studies on the social and cultural life of African Texans. 

Ditches Across the Desert

Stephen Bogener, Assistant Archivist for the University Libraries

Texas Tech University Libraries

Abstract: Settlement of the West came slowly, based on advances in technology and the harnessing of nature, especially water. Early on, the arid Pecos country seemed to have too little water to make it tamable. With the downturn in ranching in southeastern New Mexico and West Texas in the late 1870s, promoter Charles Eddy joined lawman Pat Garrett in a scheme to dam the Pecos River and turn the area into an irrigated agricultural oasis. Myriad personalities and interests combined and clashed over the Pecos Valley reservoirs and canals. Wealthy easterners invested in the region, and farmers labored to transform it into productive cropland. Together, they changed the valley from cattle land to towns and irrigated farms.  Although it now leads a precarious existence, the contest over its water--within New Mexico and between New Mexico and Texas through the Pecos River Compact--continues.

Lubbock: Gem of the South Plains

Stephen Bogener, Assistant Archivist for the University Libraries

Texas Tech University Libraries

Abstract: Rising 200 to 1000 feet above the surrounding countryside, the Llano Estacado in northwest Texas stretches for almost 300 miles north to south and 150 to 200 miles east to west, the southernmost extension of the High Plains. Breaking the horizon along the southeastern edge of this 50,000-square mile expanse of earth and sky lies Lubbock: Gem of the South Plains. Once the home of buffalo, Comanche, and legendary ranches, Lubbock's rich history is only surpassed by a progressive business climate, thriving educational resources and opportunities as braod as the wide-open vistas around the city. With an entrepreneurial spirit unaffected by national economic downturns, Lubbock moves steadily into the twenty-first century.

Catholics, Politics, and Public Policy: Beyond Left and Right

Clarke Cochran, Professor of Political Science

Texas Tech College of Arts & Sciences

Abstract: This book summarizes Catholic social theory and applies its principles to current controversies in public policy: crime, health care reform, the family, environment, income assistance, war and peace, and economic policy.

A Concise Introduction to Computer Languages

Daniel Cooke, Computer Science Department Chairperson

Texas Tech College of Engineering

Abstract: This textbook serves as an upper-level undergraduate or lower-level graduate class in language design. It includes material on the tools of language design, the motivations for new languages, and the currently available language paradigms.  In learning a new language, one must remember that there are categories of executable instructions based upon the small set of things a computer can do. Beyond this small set of machine capabilities one can describe (as instructions to a compiler/interpreter) program and data structures.  A language's semantics should be precisely described so that there is no ambiguity. 

Fundamentals of Investments for Financial Planning

David M. Cordell, Associate Professor of Personal Financial Planning

Texas Tech College of Human Sciences

Abstract: While the vast majority of investments texts are directed at institutional investors, Fundamentals of Investments for Financial Planning presents investment topics in a way that is most appropriate for financial planners dealing with retail clients. In addition to standard topics such as securities valuation, the text addresses life cycle investing and individual risk tolerance. It also emphasizes the practice standards promulgated by the Certified Financial Planner Board of Standards.

Narrative and Consciousness: Literature, Psychology, and the Brain

Gary Fireman, Associate Professor of Psychology 

Texas Tech College of Arts & Sciences

Abstract: Understanding the role of narrative in determining individual and collective consciousness has been elusive from within traditional, academic frameworks. The contributors to this volume argue that so broad and complex a problem requires examination from outside of current disciplinary definitions. Recognizing the different approaches to examining personal stories will allow for the coordination of how narrative seems (its phenomenology), with what mental labor it functions (its psychology), and how it is realized (its neurobiology). Only by overcoming the boundaries erected by multiple theoretical and empirical traditions can one begin to comprehend the relatiionship between narrative and consciousness. Narrative and Consciousness brings together essays by exceptional scholars and scientists in literary theory, psychology, and neuroscience to reexamine how stories are constructed, how stories structure experience, and how stories are rooted in the material reality of the human body.

Chapter entitled "Word Order and Discourse Genre in Tohono O 'odham," from Formal Approaches to Function in Grammar, 2003

Colleen Fitzgerald, Assistant Professor of Linguistics

Texas Tech College of Arts & Sciences

Abstract: Tohono O 'odham (also known as Papago) is a Native American language from the Uto-Aztecan language and is spoken in Arizona and Sonora, Mexico. Rhythm is cognitively salient to O 'odham speakers, and the rhythm of this language permeates all aspects of language use. In words, Tohono O 'odham displays a strong-weak (stressed-unstressed) pattern that is trochaic. Beyond the lexicon, this trochaic pattern surfaces in various ways in modern poetry and traditional narrative. Gradient rhythmic effects surface across the genre types, structuring word order patterns. Rhythm controls syntax and discourse, with the trochaic patterns repeating as a motif.

The Handbook of Food-Drug Interactions

Eric Frankel, Clinical Assistant Professor of Pharmacy Practice; Adjunct Professor

Texas Tech College of Human Sciences

Abstract: With contributions from the fields of pharmacy, dietetics, and medicine, Handbook of Food-Drug Interactions serves as an interdisciplinary guide to the prevention and correction of negative food-drug interactions. Rather than simply list potential food-drug interactions, this book provides explanations and gives specific recommendations based on the frequency and severity of reactions. Each chapter brings together the unique talents and knowledge of practitioners in different disciplines who provide a clear, thorough treatment of this important subject.

Book chapter entitled "Library Prophets and Library Pornographers: Some Problems That Arise When We Talk About Libraries and the Web," from Last One Out Turn Out the Lights: Is This the Future of American and Canadian Libraries?

Stephen Good, Associate Law Librarian

Texas Tech School of Law

Abstract: This chapter appears in the section "The Tug of War between Libraries and the Web: Who Will End Up in the Dirt?" This paper is less concerned with specific predictions about the Internet or libraries and more with how framing the question sets parameters on both the debate and the answers which result. The paper works out distinctions between three factions claiming to speak for libraries' future pornographers (who want whatever is technologically sexy, regardless of consequences), prophets (who are concerened that libraries should stay on a trajectory consistent with libraries in the past), and false prophets (who want to be "right" about how the future will turn out without allowing for choice or conversation about where libraries should go). 

Book chapter entitled "Capacity Building for Sustainable Development: The Dilemma of Islamization of Environmental Institutions," from Islam and Ecology: A Bestowed Trust

Safei Hamed, Assistant Professor of Landscape Architecture

Texas Tech College of Architecture

Abstract: The environmental crisis falls hardest upon the world's poor, a disproportionate number of whom are Muslims. Islam contains a strong message of social justice, which challenges many of the environmentally destructive development models currently in place.  Moreover, the Islamic tradition contains rich sources for environmental ethics, although this dimension has not yet figured prominently in the discourse of contemporary Muslim intellectuals who tend to see environmental issues as symptoms of broader social justice concerns.  In the Islamic worldview humans are seen as stewards over a creation that belongs ultimately not to humans, but to God.  Islamic law provides for levels of environmental protection that exceed in some cases those in contemporary Western legal systems, but throughout the Muslim world these traditions have been replaced or allowed to lapse.  Today, however, Muslims everywhere are coming to see the environment as an issue affecting the welfare of all present and future generations, and they are turning with renewed interest to the guidance that Islamic models of stewardship can provide.

School Officials and the Courts: Update 2003

Fred Hartmeister, Professor of Education and Law

Texas Tech College of Education

Abstract: This is the 24th in a series of ERS monographs designed to summarize judicial decisions on elementary and secondary education issues. Its purpose is to help school administrators and others keep aware of court activities in the field of public education. The monograph is divided into eight chapters, and topics cover such topics as pupils, teachers, administrators, finance, special education and religion.
Donated, but not catalogued.

Book chapter entitled "From Library--College to Information--Literacy: An Evolving Strategy for Educating Library Users," from Musings, Meanderings, and Monsters, Too: Essays on Academic Librarianship

Jon Hufford, Assistant Librarian

Texas Tech University Libraries

Abstract: On January 10, 1989, the American Library Association's Presidential Committee on Information Literacy issued its report on information literacy.  Following the publication of this report, the idea of information literacy for everyone flourished within the profession and has become one of its hottest topics, evolving numerous workshops, seminars, discussion forums, and published articles. What many library and information science professionals may not be aware of is information literacy's long-standing pedigree. The philosophy and basic tenets of information literacy are not the newborn progeny of individuals who, stimulated by the phenomenal growth of computer technology and the Internet in recent years, experienced a sudden flash of genius that led to several new ideas they defined with a new term. On the contrary, these ideas have a time-honored past that significantly adds substance and validity to the information literacy initiative. This chapter examines that past, concentrating especially on the library-college movement which was a significant part of it.

All the Beautiful Sinners

Stephen Jones, Assistant Professor of English

Texas Tech College of Arts & Sciences

Abstract: Deputy Sheriff Jim Doe plunges into a renegade manhunt after the town's sheriff is gunned down. But unbeknownst to him the suspect, an American Indian, holds chilling connections to the disappearance of Doe s sister years before. And the closer Doe gets to the fugitive's trail, the more he realizes that his own involvement in the case is hardly coincidental. A descendant of the Blackfeet Nation himself, Doe keeps getting mistaken for the killer he's chasing. And when the FBI's finest three profilers descend on the case, Doe suspects the hunt has only just begun.

The Bird is Gone: A Manifesto

Stephen Jones, Assistant Professor of English

Texas Tech College of Arts & Sciences

Abstract: Imagine a world where the American government signed a conservation act to "restore all indigenous flora and fauna to the Great Plains," which means suddenly the Great Plains are Indian again. Now fast-forward fourteen years to a bowling alley deep in the Indian Territories. People that bowling alley with characters named LP Deal, Cat Stand, Mary Boy, Courtney Peltdowne, Back Iron, Denim Horse, Naitche, and give them a chance to find a treaty signed under duress by General Sherman, which effectively gives all of the Americas back to the Indians; only hide that treaty in a stolen pipe, put it in a locker, and flush the key down the toilet. Ask LP Deal and the rest what they will trade to get that key back--maybe, everything.

Narrative and Consciousness: Literature, Psychology, and the Brain

Ted McVay, Associate Professor of Classical and Modern Languages and Literature

Texas Tech College of Arts & Sciences

Abstract: Understanding the role of narrative in determining individual and collective consciousness has been elusive from within traditional, academic frameworks. The contributors to this volume argue that so broad and complex a problem requires examination from outside of current disciplinary definitions. Recognizing the different approaches to examining personal stories will allow for the coordination of how narrative seems (its phenomenology), with what mental labor it functions (its psychology), and how it is realized (its neurobiology). Only by overcoming the boundaries erected by multiple theoretical and empirical traditions can one begin to comprehend the relatiionship between narrative and consciousness. Narrative and Consciousness brings together essays by exceptional scholars and scientists in literary theory, psychology, and neuroscience to reexamine how stories are constructed, how stories structure experience, and how stories are rooted in the material reality of the human body.

Historic Development of the Convent of St. Dominique at Lima, Peru (1535-2003)

Jose Olascoaga, Instructor of Architecture

Texas Tech College of Architecture

Abstract: This book synthesizes about 470 years of the building, growth, and evolution of the oldest colonial group of Lima, since its foundation in 1535. The convent of St. Dominique at Lima is a living taxonomy of diverse styles. Through direct observation and the analysis of historical documents from Peruvian archives, the style of the different parts of the convent were identified, dated, and analyzed. This historical-stylistic analysis is subdivided and arranged according to the periods of Gothic, Renaissance, Baroque, Neoclassic, Republican, and Modern architecture. This book considers that stylistic changes of the convent of St. Dominique at Lima were the result of social and political changes in colonial times and republican times, as well as of variations in the public taste. However, stylistic changes were also occasioned by a building response to the destructive earthquakes of the years 1687, 1746, and 1940.
Donated, but not catalogued yet.

Nonprofit Organizations Law and Policy

Marilyn Phelan, Robert H. Bean Professor of Law

Texas Tech School of Law

Abstract: This is a casebook on laws relating to nonprofit organizations for use in law classes. It contains 16 chapters that consider organizational structures for nonprofit organizations; the status and rights of directors and members; governance of nonprofit organizations; the requirements to obtain and maintain tax exempt status; and specialized legal issues related to certain specific nonprofits such as religious organizations, private schools, hospitals, social clubs, political organizations, and trade and professional organizations.

Poems

John Poch, Assistant Professor of Creative Writing

Texas Tech College of Arts & Sciences

Abstract: Orchises Press is pleased to announce the first book by a much watched young writer, John Poch. The extraordinary mastery of form, the certain ear, and the freshness of a new voice mark this exciting debut. Entitled simply Poems , this is a stunning collection by one of the coolest, most technically adroit poets to appear in a decade.

Playas of the Great Plains

Loren Smith, Professor of Range, Wildlife and Fisheries Management

Texas Tech College of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources

Abstract: Shallow wetlands that occur primarily in semi-arid to arid environments, playas are keystone ecosystems in the western Great Plains of North America. Providing irreplaceable habitat for native plants and animals, including migratory birds, they are essential for the maintenance of biotic diversity throughout the region. Playas also serve to recharge the aquifer that supplies much of the water for endangered playas across the Great Plains, making urgent the need to understand their ecology and implement effective conservation measures. This book provides a state-of-the-art survey of all that is currently known about Great Plains playa ecology and conservation. The book defines playas and characterizes their origin, development, flora, fauna, structure, function, and diversity.

Alternative Kilns & Firing Techniques

James Watkins, Professor of Architecture

Texas Tech College of Architecture

Abstract: This book demonstrates in detail how to build low-cost, low-tech, yet high-quality kilns. These clever devices make it possible to produce rich surface effects from alternative reduction firing techniques. In addition to showing the basic procedures for using each kiln, easy-to-follow directions for many fast-fire methods unfold in color photographs: you’ll see how to achieve terra sigillata surfaces with direct chemical application, and how to do traditional crackle-glaze raku and smoke finishes.

Not Till We Are Lost

William Wenthe, Associate Professor of Creative Writing

Texas Tech College of Arts & Sciences

Abstract: William Wenthe's second collection takes its title from a passage in Walden: "Not till we are lost, in other words not till we have lost the world, do we begin to find ourselves, and realize where we are, and the infinite extent of our relations." Beginning with the necessary dislocation and loss, the book strives toward the rediscovery of relations--to family and lover, to culture, to environment. The destination, as well as the difficult means of arrival, is always love; no mere word, but "an offering made by fire, of a sweet savor" (Leviticus)--a pain and sweetness in which loss and celebration converge.

The Perfect Wrong Note: Learning to Trust Your Musical Self

William Westney, Paul Whitfield Horn Professor of Music

Texas Tech College of Visual & Performing Arts

Abstract: A groundbreaking work designed to help readers, at any level of musical experience or skill, rediscover their own path to the natural, transcendent fulfillment of making music. It questions some conventional notions about perfectionism in the practice room and explores the unique value of the "honest mistake " in music and in life.