2004 Faculty Academic Contributions Exhibit 2004 Virtual Exhibit 2004 Entries- articles

20th Annual Faculty Academic Contributions Virtual Exhibit- Journal Articles

  The following articles were part of the 2004 exhibit:
"Leadership: Rudi Giuliani's Lessons from Life, Law, and 9/11," from Journal of Thought : Spring 2003

Judith Atcheson, Visiting Assistant Professor of Curriculum and Instruction

Texas Tech College of Education

Abstract: Rudy Giuliani approaches the topic of leadership through the eyes of a former New York City mayor and current civic leader. Experiences in his personal, professional, and political life have implications for leaders, including those in educational settings.  His “I’m responsible” philosophy is drawn from his varied background, including his job as a federal attorney, his battle with cancer, and his role as mayor during the drama of 9/ll and its aftermath. Giuliani suggests at least eight general principles for leaders. To enable organizations to excel, Giuliani stresses the importance of open communication, where public recognition and accountability are encouraged. While mayor he held daily morning meetings that allowed open discussion, motivational statements, access to human resources, and the potential for creative solutions. Great teamwork must be focused around an organization’s mission and serves to make each member of a team better. Giuliani’s directness, candor, and courage earned him the title, “Mayor of the World,” and left a legacy of leadership that will be forever etched in our minds as will September 11, 2001. Educators would do well to study and take to heart the powerful leadership lessons of Rudy Giuliani.
Loaned personal copy, not catalogued.

"Archaeology Reports: When Context Becomes an Active Agent in the Rhetorical Process," from Technical Communication Quarterly: Fall 2003

Ken Baake, Assistant Professor of English

Texas Tech College of Arts & Sciences

Abstract: This article explores the writing of archaeologists who argue that the metaphor of context-as-rhetorical-situation may understate the power that context has to shape scientific discourse. The author offers instead the metaphor of context-as-active-agent in the rhetorical situation, one that sometimes reifies values that are dangerous to the archaeologists belief systems. As scholars of technical writing, we must develop a greater understanding of the subtle but powerful influences that context wields on the writing we read and help to produce. 

Edited journal entitled Intertexts : Vol. 7(1) Spring 2003

Laura Beard, Associate Professor of Classical and Modern Languages and Literature

Texas Tech College of Arts & Sciences

Abstract:Intertexts is a journal of comparative literature and theoretical reflection that publishes articles which employ innovative approaches to explore relations between literary, historical, theoretical, philosophical or social texts. The Spring 2003 issue (7.1) includes scholarly articles on topics taken from a variety of centuries, genres and countries. Articles include: "Sex in the Gym: Athletic Trainers and Pedagogical Pederasty," "My Worldly Goods Do Thee Endow: Economic Conservatism, Widowhood, and the Mid- and Late Eighteenth-Century Novel," "Displacement, Desire, Identity and the 'Diasporic Momentum': Two Slavic Writers in Latin America," "'This Book of Ours': the Crisis of Authorship and Joseph Heller's Portrait of an Artist as an Old Man," and "Persistent Oscillations: Poetics of the Feminine in Pound."

"Discordant Identities and Disjunctive Authority in a Perverse Narrative: Julieta Campos' Tiene los cabellos rojizos y se llama Sabina,"from Latin American Women's Narrative: Practices and Theoretical Perspectives: 2003

Laura Beard, Associate Professor of Classical and Modern Languages and Literature

Texas Tech College of Arts & Sciences

Abstract: This article looks at the problematics of identity and authority in Julieta Campos' 1978 metafictional novel Tiene los cabellos rojizos y se llama Sabina. I demonstrate how Campos' novel fits Judith Roof's definition of a perverse narrative, "a narrative about narrative dissolution, a narrative that continually short circuits, that both frustrates and winks at" those expectations readers bring to the text (Roof 1996: xxiv).
Loaned personal copy, not catalogued.

"Whose Life in the Mirror? Examining Three Mexican Telenovelas as Cultural and Commerical Products," from Studies in Latin American Popular Culture: Vol. 22 2003

Laura Beard, Associate Professor of Classical and Modern Languages and Literatures

Texas Tech College of Arts & Sciences

Journal Articles

Abstract: This article departs from the statement both that telenovelas are one of the most vital and current cultural products that are produced, shared and exported by Latin American countries and that, as such, they contribute in important ways to the social construction of gender in Latin America. Looking at three Mexican telenovelas airing in Mexico during the 1999-2000 academic year, I explore gender roles as well as social and racial politics at play in the telenovelas. The telenovelas chosen for analysis are "Laberintos de Pasion" (Televisa), "El Candidato" (TV Azteca) and "La vida en el Espejo" (TV Azteca).

"Tax Administration as Inquisitorial Process & the Partial Paradigm Shift of the IRS Restructuring and Reform Act of 1998," from Florida Law Review: Vol. 56

Bryan Camp, Associate Professor of Law

Texas Tech School of Law

Abstract: This article argues that tax legislation in 1998 altered the structure of tax administration by inserting adversarial process elements into an otherwise inquisitorial process paradigm. The article compares inquisitorial to adversarial process both descriptively and normatively. First, when the same entity acts simultaneously as both a decisionmaker and evidence-gatherer, the process can be described as inquisitorial. In contrast, adversarial process separates decisionmaking from evidence-gathering. Second, inquisitorial process puts the value of finding truth above the value of preserving individual autonomy so that violations of autonomy may be justified if they result in truth. In contrast, adversarial process compromises truth in order to preserve individual autonomy from state intrusion. The structure of tax administration demonstrates that it has long been strongly inquisitorial in both respects.

"Howard Pyle's Story of King Arthur and His Knights and the Bourgeois Boy Reader," from Arthuriana : Vol. 13(2) 2003

Julie Nelson Couch, Assistant Professor of English

Texas Tech College of Arts & Sciences

Abstract: My analysis of Howard Pyle's use of genre-based exclusions to construct an American bourgeois boy reader challenges the accepted idea that the Story of King Arthur and His Knights presents a truly democratized Arthurian world.
The Libraries do not currently own this journal.

"Cocaine in Miskitu Villages," from Ethnology : Vol. 42(2)

Phil Dennis, Professor of Sociology, Anthropology, and Social Work

Texas Tech College of Arts & Sciences

Abstract: During the 1990s, Miskitu people in the coastal villages north of Puerto Cabezas began finding cocaine washed up on the beach and on the Miskitu Keys just off the coast. Drug runners carrying the cocaine north apparently dump it overbvoard when pursued by authorities. Cocaine wealth has been used differently in two local communitites. In Sandy Bay, cocaine money has been used to build new houses, schools, and churches, in a project of self-directed development. As a result, Sandy Bay appears prosperous. In Awastara, on the other hand, there is little evidence of new wealth from cocaine. Unfortunately, in all the coastal communities, cocaine finds have also led to deaths from overdoses, cocaine addiction among young men, and increased theft and violence.

"Higher Education on Nicaragua's Multicultural Atlantic Coast," from Cultural Survival Quarterly : Vol. 27(4)

Phil Dennis, Professor of Sociology, Anthropology, and Social Work

Texas Tech College of Arts & Sciences

Abstract: The University of the Autonomous Regions of the Caribbean Coast of Nicaragua (URACCAN) is a poor but valiant university which provides the first opportunities in higher education for the Black Creole and indigenous peoples of this isolated region. Supported by Fulbright grants, Dennis taught "Anthropology of Health" to a large graduate class at URRACCAN in 1999-2000, and Herlihy is currently teaching "Ethnographic Field Methods" there, in the new Masters program in social anthropology. This article describes the University and details some of Dennis' teaching experiences there.

"Investigation of Space Syntax Methods Through Wayfinding in Hospital Buildings," from Proceedings of Space Syntax 4th International Symposium, Space Syntax Laboratory, The Bartlett School of Graduate Studies, University College London: June 2003
 

Saif Haq, Assistant Professor & Coordinator, LPMD Program

Texas Tech College of Architecture

Abstract: This article reports a research that investigated the role of topological environmental variables in wayfinding within real hospital buildings. Space Syntax was used to determine environmental qualities and they were found to be significant in predicting the wayfinding use of spaces. It was also found that the spaces from which wayfinding starts play a major role in wayfinding performance. These studies also allowed testing of Space Syntax theories and expansion of its basic assumptions.
Loaned personal copy, not catalogued.

Editor of Journal articles entitled "Scholarly Approaches to Children's and Adolescent Literature," from CEA Critic : Vol. 65(1) Fall 2002

Ann Hawkins, Visiting Assistant Professor of English

Texas Tech College of Arts & Sciences

Abstract: This collection of essays offers scholarly approaches to children's and adolescent literature, as opposed to pedagogical or evaluative ones. Our aim in creating this special issue was to offer more focused scholarly and theoretical analysis of texts often relegated to the nursery or the teacher-training classroom.

"Speaking Women, Writing Women: Identity and Voice in an Age of Revolution," from Eighteenth-Century Studies : vol. 36(2) Spring 2003

Ann Hawkins, Visiting Assistant Professor of English

Texas Tech College of Arts & Sciences

Abstract: What happens when woman speaks or writes? Can she speak only 'as woman' or can she speak from other social positions? Can she speak, as men can, from the senate, the pulpit or the bar? And if so, does that flexibility in speech roles suggest a like flexibility in women's social roles? When a woman speaks for--or to--other women, what language must she use? In times of great social or political pressure, does woman's ability to speak enlarge or constrict? And finally, do women speak differently in an "age of revolution" than in other times? This invited review essay considers these questions in a series of five recent books on eighteenth- and nineteenth- century women writers.

"Marguerite, Countess of Blessington and L.E.L.: Evidence of a Friendship," from ANQ (American Notes and Queries) : Vol. 16(2) Spring 2003

Ann Hawkins, Visiting Assistant Professor of English

Texas Tech College of Arts & Sciences

Abstract: Although critics have gradually recognized the connections between romantic women writers, criticism to date has tended to consider them separately. This tendency rests on a common conception that romantic women writers worked alone or in isolation--often within the confines of a family circle. The paper--based on original archival research--shows that two popular, financially successful, mid-nineteenth century British women writers shared a dynamic relationship. Its significance for readers of romantic women writers is that it indicates not just that these women knew each other but that they personally and professionally desired to help each other succed in the literary marketplace of their day, and that they acted on that desire in ways that showed the depth of their intent.

"Peirce, Clifford, and Quantum Theory," from International Journal of Theoretical Physics : 2003

Kenneth Ketner, Paul Whitfield Horn Professor; Charles Sanders Peirce Interdisciplinary Professor

Texas Tech Institute for Studies in Pragmaticism

Abstract: Beginning in 1870 Charles Sanders Peirce published a series of papers on a “logic of relations,” which corresponded to a linear associative algebra. This algebra is related by a linear transformation to quaternions and thus to the C(3, 0) algebra of William Kingdon Clifford. This Clifford algebra contains the Pauli matrices and so constitutes an operator basis for the nonrelativistic quantum theory of spin one-half particles. A further unification is achieved by taking the wave functions themselves to be 2 × 2 matrices which are Peirce logical operators and also elements of the Clifford algebra. Thus we have discovered a direct path from the Peirce logic to quantum theory. A diagrammatic method follows from the Peirce/Clifford algebraic approach and is suitable for describing particle interactions.

Edited journal entitled Intertexts: Vol. 7 (1) Spring 2003

David Larmour, Professor of Classics

Texas Tech College of Arts & Sciences

Abstract:Intertexts  is a journal of comparative literature and theoretical reflection that publishes articles which employ innovative approaches to explore relations between literary, historical, theoretical, philosophical or social texts. The Spring 2003 issue includes scholarly articles on topics taken from a variety of centuries, genres and countries. Articles include: "Sex in the Gym: Athletic Trainers and Pedagogical Pederasty," "My Worldly Goods Do Thee Endow: Economic Conservatism, Widowhood, and the Mid- and Late Eighteenth-Century Novel," "Displacement, Desire, Identity and the 'Diasporic Momentum': Two Slavic Writers in Latin America," "'This Book of Ours': the Crisis of Authorship and Joseph Heller's Portrait of an Artist as an Old Man," and "Persistent Oscillations: Poetics of the Feminine in Pound."

"High-pressure high-temperature x-ray diffraction of beta boron to 30 Gpa," from Physical Review B : May 2003

Yanzhang Ma, Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering

Texas Tech College of Engineering

Abstract: This study investigated the relative benefits of peer-controlled and moderated online collaboration during group problem solving. Thirty-five self-selected groups of four or five students were randomly assigned to the two conditions, which used the same online collaborative tool to solve twelve problem scenarios in an undergraduate statistics course. A score for the correctness of the solutions and a reasoning score were analyzed. A survey was administered to reveal differences in students' related attitudes. Three conclusions were reached: Groups assigned to moderated forums displayed significantly higher reasoning scores than those in the peer-controlled condition, but the moderation did not affect correctness of solutions; students in the moderated forums reported being more likely to choose to use an optional online forum for future collaborations; and students who reported having no difficulty during collaboration reported being more likely to choose to use an optional online forum in the future.

Edited journal entitled Intertexts : Vol. 7 (1) Spring 2003

Sharon Nell, Associate Professor of Classical and Modern Languages and Literature

Texas Tech College of Arts & Sciences

Abstract: Intertexts  is a journal of comparative literature and theoretical reflection that publishes articles which employ innovative approaches to explore relations between literary, historical, theoretical, philosophical or social texts. The Spring 2003 issue (7.1) includes scholarly articles on topics taken from a variety of centuries, genres and countries. Articles include: "Sex in the Gym: Athletic Trainers and Pedagogical Pederasty," "My Worldly Goods Do Thee Endow: Economic Conservatism, Widowhood, and the Mid- and Late Eighteenth-Century Novel," "Displacement, Desire, Identity and the 'Diasporic Momentum': Two Slavic Writers in Latin America," "'This Book of Ours': the Crisis of Authorship and Joseph Heller's Portrait of an Artist as an Old Man," and "Persistent Oscillations: Poetics of the Feminine in Pound."

"Age-specific patterns in density-dependent growth of white crappie, Proxis annularis," from Fisheries Management and Ecology: Vol.11 Feb. 2004

Kevin Pope, Assistant Professor of Range, Wildlife, & Fisheries Management

Texas Tech College of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources

Abstract: The relationship between growth in white crappie, Proxis annularis Rafinesque, and climate, lake morphometry, and population density was studied in 103 Texas reservoirs. Growth of age-0 through age-3 white crappie was significantly (P< 0.05) related to latitude, growing season and surface area. Growth of age-1 through age-5 white crappies also was related to annual precipitation. Multiple linear regression models with precipitation and mean catch per unit effort (CPUE) white crappies as independent variables explained 14% to 22% of the variation in growth of age-0, -1, and -2 white crappie. In contrast, growth of age-3, -4, and -5 white crappies was unrelated to CPUE. Apparently, between age 2 and 3, the density of white crappie in Texas reservoirs falls below a density-dependent growth threshold beyond which growth is no longer related to density. This density-dependent threshold was likely related to angler harvest of larger, older white crappie.
The Libraries do not currently own this journal.

"Teaching the Gothic Novel and Dramatic Adaptations," from Approaches to Teaching Gothic Fiction: The British and American Traditions : 2003

Marjean D. Purinton, Professor of English

Texas Tech College of Arts & Sciences

Abstract: This contribution to Approaches to Teaching Gothic Fiction: The British and American Traditions presents a pedagogical discussion of Romantic gothic, including an overview of the history of Romantic Gothic drama and creative classroom strategies showing how to integrate Gothic fiction and drama by juxtaposing such important works such as Mary Shelley's novel Frankenstein and their dramatic adaptations.
The Libraries do not currently own this journal.

Essay entitled "Pedagogy and Passions: Teaching Joanna Baillie's Dramas," from Joanna Baillie, Romantic Dramatist: Critical Essays : 2003

Marjean D. Purinton, Professor of English

Texas Tech College of Arts & Sciences

Abstract: This essay, from a collection entitled Joanna Baillie, Romantic Dramatist: Critical Essays , looks at how Romanticists might teach Joanna Baillie's dramas. It examines what resources exist and how we might link Baillie to current themes in Romantic-period curricula. At a theoretical level, it reveals the pedagogical agenda Baillie envisioned for her dramas, for she recognized theatre as the site for powerful public discourse that could reify, challenge, and change cultural patterns and societal customs. The praxis aspect of this essay makes Baillie a more accessible Romantic writer for students and faculty of the early nineteenth century.

"Overcoming Psychological Obstacles to Optimal Online Search Performance," from The Electronic Library: Vol. 21 (2) 2003

Brian Quinn, Associate Librarian

Texas Tech University Libraries

Abstract: Successful online searching is more than simply a matter of mastering search technique. Emotions, attitudes and environmental factors like stress also play a crucial role in determining whether an online search will be successful or not. This article focuses on the important relationship between emotion and cognition, how they affect each other, and what the implications are for online searchers. It investigates how affect and mood influence key cognitive functions and can pose psychological hurdles related to motivation, arousal, attention, concentration, self-confidence, and self-efficacy, all of which can be significant factors in determining the effectiveness of a search. Viewing searching behavior as a form of mental and physical performance similar to that of an athlete or performing artist, draws on the growing body of psychological research on performance which suggests that having proper mindset can make an important difference in whether a searcher is successful.

"Iraq War: Anticipatory Self-Defense or Unlawful Unilateralism," from California Western International Law Journal: Vol. 34(1) Fall 2003

Jorge Alberto Ramirez, Associate Professor; Director, International Programs

Texas Tech School of Law

Abstract: As suggested by the title, the article examines the legal basis for the United States' pursuit of war in Iraq, as well as the failure of international cooperation at the United Nations. The article concludes by noting that the United States has "stretched the limits of the customary law of anticipatory self-defense to its logical extreme" setting a dangerous precedent that will be open to abuse or mistake by all nation states because of the inability to judge the accuracy of intelligence information. I hope the article will contribute to the ongoing dialogue regarding the Bush administration's use of the weapons of mass destruction issue as justification for going to war in Iraq. I suspect this matter will remain an important topic for discussion throughout this election year, if not well into the future. 

"Measuring School Spirit: A National Teaching Exercise," from Teaching of Psychology : Vol. 31(1) 2004

Alan Reifman, Associate Professor of Human Development and Family Studies

Texas Tech College of Human Sciences

Abstract: We developed a novel variation on classroom data collection by having students conduct a national research project. Students at 20 different colleges and universities measured school spirit at their institutions according to several operational criteria (school apparel wearing, car stickers, alumni donation rate, ratings by a major sports publication, and questionnaire measures). Instructors then linked this information into one large dataset, allowing students to analyze and compare trends measured at their school with those measured at other schools. We discuss the process of organizing a national study (recruitment of faculty participants, dissemination of instruments, compilation of data), aspects of the project that instructors thought were most educationally valuable, and substantive results of the study (how well the different measures of school spirit correlated).

"Everyday Geometries: Synthetic Facts and Superficial Qualities," from Journal of Architectural Education : Vol. 57(2) Nov. 2003

Brian T. Rex, Assistant Professor of Architecture

Texas Tech College of Architecture

Abstract: Streamlining becomes here an organic force as it relates to the dynamic equilibrium of the motion of the body within encompassed space.

"The Use of Humor in Promoting Positive Provider--Patient Interactions in a Hospital Rehabilitation Unit" from Health Communication: Vol. 15(3) 2003

Juliann Scholl, Assistant Professor of Communication Studies

Texas Tech College of Arts & Sciences

Abstract: Humor within the health care setting can serve to facilitate positive patient-provider interactions and to create a patient-centered environment. This article provided an ethnographic account of patient-provider interactions held during therapeutic activity sessions within a hospital unit (MIRTH) designed to promote therapeutic humor. This study's findings suggest that humor in these activity sessions was mainly a by-product of more predominant effects, such as patients' positive attitude and happiness. Whereas MIRTH used contrived humor to protray its identity as a humor unit, staff and patients also took advantage of spontaneous humor that emerged out of interactions. Humor appeared secondary to the primary outcome of promoting patients' happiness and well-being.

"Perceptions of Play Therapy in Taiwan: The Voices of School Counselors and Counselor Educators," from International Journal for the Advancement of Counseling : Vol. 25(1) March 2003

Yih-Jiun Shen, Assistant Professor of Counselor Education

Texas Tech College of Education

Abstract: The current status of play therapy in the elementary schools of Taiwan was investigated in relation to its compatibility with Chinese culture and its potential for wider societal adoption. Seven participants, four counselor educators and three elementary school counselors, in west Taiwan participated in this phenomenological qualitative inquiry. Seven assertions emerged from the interviewing data, implying that the potential for adopting play therapy in Taiwanese school counseling is embedded in the society. However, there are insufficient facilities and a lack of play therapy resources. Further investigation of the infrastructure in school counseling is necessary and suggestions for practice and research regarding the development of play therapy and child counseling are presented.
The Libraries do not currently own this journal.

Bibliography entitled "Barry Lopez Bibliography" from Iron Horse Literary Review : Vol. 5(1) 2003

Diane Warner, Associate Librarian for the Southwest Collection

Texas Tech University Libraries

Abstract: A selected bibliography of work by Barry Lopez, winner of the National Book Award for Of Wolves and Men  and author of numerous other stories, essays, and books. This bibliography appeared in Iron Horse Literary Review.

Journal article entitled "Lure-size Restrictions in Recreational Fisheries," from Fisheries:  28(6) June 2003

Gene Wilde, Assistant Professor of Range, Wildlife, & Fisheries Management

Texas Tech College of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources

Abstract: We conducted angling experiments to examine the potential use of lure-size restrictions to affect or reinforce minimum-length limits. We used four sizes of lures and five color patterns to assess effects of lure size and color on number and length of largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) captured by angling. There was a significant (F = 12.03; df = 1,177; p = 0.0007) lure-size effect on total length (TL) of captured largemouth bass. Catch rates of fish > 305-mm TL ranged from 0 to 0.5 fish per hour and was unrelated to lure size. Lure color pattern had no affect on length and number of fish captured (F = 1.44; df = 4,230; p = 0.2320). Angling experiments and results from angling simulations suggest lure-size restrictions can be used to indirectly affect or reinforce length limits and provide managers with a means to reduce incidental catch of undersized fish.
To obtain this journal from the Libraries collection,

Online journal article entitled "The Effects of Peer-Controlled or Moderated Online Collaboration on Group Problem Solving and Related Attitudes," from Canadian Journal of Learning and Technology : Vol. 29(3) Fall 2003

Ke Zhang, Assistant Professor of Instructional Technology

Texas Tech College of Education

Abstract: This study investigated the relative benefits of peer-controlled and moderated online collaboration during group problem solving. Thirty-five self-selected groups of four or five students were randomly assigned to the two conditions, which used the same online collaborative tool to solve twelve problem scenarios in an undergraduate statistics course. A score for the correctness of the solutions and a reasoning score were analyzed. A survey was administered to reveal differences in students' related attitudes. Three conclusions were reached: 1. Groups assigned to moderated forums displayed significantly higher reasoning scores than those in the peer-controlled condition, but the moderation did not affect correctness of solutions. 2. Students in the moderated forums reported being more likely to choose to use an optional online forum for future collaborations. 3. Students who reported having no difficulty during collaboration reported being more likely to choose to use an optional online forum in the future.